people

A Quote by Adolf Hitler on belief, heaven, hell, lies, and people

By means of shrewd lies, unremittingly repeated, it is possible to make people believe that heaven is hell - and hell heaven. The greater the lie, the more readily it will be believed.

Adolf Hitler (1889 - 1945)

Source: Mein Kampf

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Adolf Hitler on lies and people

The great masses of the people . . . will more easily fall victims to a big lie than to a small one.

Adolf Hitler (1889 - 1945)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Adlai Ewing Stevenson on people and truth

Let us talk sense to the American people. Let us tell them the truth, that there are no gains without pains.

Adlai Stevenson (1900 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Adlai Ewing Stevenson on people and progress

All progress has resulted from people who took unpopular positions.

Adlai Stevenson (1900 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Adlai Ewing Stevenson on action, age, earth, emotion, faith, knowledge, love, men, people, and words

What a man knows at 50 that he did not know at 20 is, for the most part, incommunicable. The knowledge he has acquired with age is not the knowledge of formulas, or forms of words, but of people, places, actions - a knowledge gained not by words but by touch, sight, sound, victories, failures, sleeplessness, devotion, love - the human experiences and emotions of this earth and of oneself and other men; and perhaps, too, a little faith, a little reverence for things one cannot see.

Adlai Stevenson (1900 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Adam Smith on economics, people, privacy, and society

It is the highest impertinence and presumption, therefore, in kings and ministers to pretend to watch over the economy of private people, and to restrain their expense. They are themselves, always, and without any exception, the greatest spendthrifts in the society.

Adam Smith

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on extremism, government, people, and virtue

While the people retain their virtue, and vigilance, no administration, by any extreme of wickedness or folly, can very seriously injure the government, in the short space of four years.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: first inaugural address (final text), March 4, 1861.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on decisions, duty, faults, government, judgment, people, politics, purpose, questions, and resignation

If the policy of the government, upon vital questions affecting the whole people, is to be irrevocably fixed by decisions of the Supreme Court, . . . the people will have ceased, to be their own rulers, having, to that extent, practically resigned their government into the hands of that eminent tribunal. Nor is there, in this view, any assault upon the court, or the judges. It is a duty, from which they may not shrink, to decide cases properly brought before them; and it is no fault of theirs, if others seek to turn their decisions to political purposes.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: first inaugural address (final text), March 4, 1861.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on good, justice, labor, liberty, men, names, people, tyranny, and world

The world has never had a good definition of the word liberty, and the American people, just now, are much in want of one. We all declare for liberty; but in using the same word we do not all mean the same thing. With some the word liberty may mean for each man to do as he pleases with himself, and the product of his labor; while with others the same word may mean for some men to do as they please with other men, and the product of other men's labor. Here are two, not only different, but incompatible things, called by the same name - liberty. And it follows that each of the things is, by the respective parties, called by two different and incompatible names - liberty and tyranny.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: address at sanitary fair, Baltimore, Maryland, April 18, 1864

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on happiness, justice, and people

People are just about as happy as they make up their minds to be.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

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