patience

A Quote by Mevlana Jelalu'ddin Rumi on joy and patience

Patience is the key to joy.

Mevlana Rumi (1207 - 1273)

Source: Rumi Daylight: A Daybook of Spiritual Guidance

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Krishna on achievement, anger, compassion, control, dedication, desires, destiny, determination, good, joy, learning, life, patience, pride, purity, sincerity, and spirituality

Be fearless and pure; never waver in your determination or your dedication to the spiritual life. Give freely. Be self-controlled, sincere, truthful, loving, and full of the desire to serve...Learn to be detached and to take joy in renunciation. Do not get angry or harm any living creature, but be compassionate and gentle; show good will to all. Cultivate vigor, patience, will, purity; avoid malice and pride. Then, you will achieve your destiny.

Krishna

Source: The Bhagavad Gita

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Allen on patience, thinking, and weakness

As the physically weak man can make himself strong by careful and patient training, so the man of weak thoughts can make them strong by exercising himself in right thinking.

James Allen (1864 - 1912)

Source: As a Man Thinketh

Contributed by: Brian

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, fear, madness, and patience

ROSS You must have patience, madam. LADY MACDUFF He had none: His flight was madness: when our actions do not, Our fears do make us traitors.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Macbeth, Act 4, Scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on ambition, belief, country, death, fortune, friendship, honor, joy, judgment, life, love, lovers, men, patience, respect, rudeness, senses, silence, slavery, tears, and wisdom

BRUTUS: Be patient till the last. Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause, and be silent, that you may hear: believe me for mine honour, and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe: censure me in your wisdom, and awake your senses, that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: - Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more. Had you rather Caesar were living and die all slaves, than that Caesar were dead, to live all free men? As Caesar loved me, I weep for him; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him: but, as he was ambitious, I slew him. There is tears for his love; joy for his fortune; honour for his valour; and death for his ambition. Who is here so base that would be a bondman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so vile that will not love his country? If any, speak; for him have I offended. I pause for a reply.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, conscience, country, cowardice, death, delay, dreams, fortune, heart, laws, life, love, merit, mind, mortality, patience, questions, resolution, respect, sleep, suffering, thought, time, trouble, and wishes

To be, or not to be: that is the question: Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep; No more; and, by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish'd. To die: to sleep; To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause. There's the respect That makes calamity of so long life; For who would bear the whips an scorns of time, The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely, The pangs of dispriz'd love, the law's delay, The insolence of office, and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make With a bare bodkin? Who would fardels bear, To grunt and sweat under a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The undiscover'd country from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will, And makes us rather bear those ills we have, Than fly to others that we know not of? Thus conscience doth make cowards of us all; And thus the native hue of resolution Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought, And enterprises of great pitch and moment With this regard their currents turn awry, And lose the name of action. Soft you now! The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons Be all my sins remember'd.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 3, scene 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on men, patience, sorrow, and virtue

No, no; 'tis all men's office to speak patience To those that wring under the load of sorrow, But no man's virtue nor sufficiency To be so moral when he shall endure The like himself. Therefore give me no counsel: My griefs cry louder than advertisement.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, Act 5, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on patience

How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Othello

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Ellery Channing on conscience, conviction, depression, duty, force, future, god, goodness, happiness, heart, ideas, energy, mercy, obedience, patience, peace, perfection, preparation, providence, purpose, soul, suffering, temptation, w

Soul Gathers Force It is possible, when the future is dim, when our depressed faculties can form no bright ideas of the perfection and happiness of a better world,-it is possible still to cling to the conviction of God's merciful purpose towards His creatures, of His parental goodness even in suffering, still to feel that the path of duty, though trodden with a heavy heart, leads to peace; still to be true to conscience; still to do our work, to resist temptation, to be useful, though with diminished energy, to give up our wills when we cannot rejoice under God's mysterious providence. In this patient, though uncheered obedience, we become prepared for light. The soul gathers force.

William Ellery Channing (1780 - 1842)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Edgar Borah on government, history, men, men and women, patience, and women

The marvel of all history is the patience with which men and women submit to burdens unnecessarily laid upon them by their governments.

William Edgar Borah (1865 - 1940)

Contributed by: Zaady

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