parenthood

A Quote by James Keller on action, brevity, home, parenthood, time, and words

We heard recently the touching story of a young flier who was killed in action. Before he died, he had time to scrawl only a few words as a brief final message to his parents back home. The note read: "Dear Mom and Pop; I had time to say my prayers. Jack."

James Keller

Source: Three Minutes by James Keller, M. M., 1950

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James E. Faust on agreement, heart, interest, listening, love, obedience, and parenthood

Listen to your parents. Be obedient to them whether you agree with them or not. They love you more than anyone else and have your best interests at heart.

James E. Faust (1920 -)

Source: Friend December, 1998, “They Spoke to Us” © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Anthony Froude on cruelty, fear, and parenthood

Fear is the parent of cruelty.

James Anthony Froude (1818 - 1894)

Source: Short Studies on Great Studies

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Agee on children, circumstances, god, goodness, ideas, life, parenthood, and responsibility

In every child who is born, under no matter what circumstances, and of no matter what parents, the potentiality of the human race is born again: and in him, too, once more, and of each of us, our terrific responsibility toward human life; toward the utmost idea of goodness, of the horror of terror, and of God.

James Agee (1909 - 1955)

Source: Let Us Now Praise Famous Men (1941)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jacques Delille on chance, choice, friendship, parenthood, and sharing

If you have one true friend, you have more than your share. Chance makes our parents, but choice makes our friends.

Jacques Delille

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by J. Reuben Clark, Jr. on belief, chastity, civilization, concern, death, debauchery, destruction, disease, friendship, life, love, misery, nations, parenthood, past, people, salvation, shame, soul, present, trust, women, and worth

Chastity is fundamental to civilization. If the race becomes unchaste, it will perish. Immorality has been basic to the destruction of mighty nations in the past. It will bring to dust the mighty nations of the present. You young people, may I directly entreat you to be chaste? Please believe me when I say that chastity is worth more than life itself. This is the doctrine my parents taught me; it is true. Better die chaste than live unchaste. The salvation of your very soul is concerned in this. I ask you to believe me whenever a man or woman, young or old, demands as the price of his friendship that you give up the righteous standards of your life, or any of them, that man's friendship is not worth the price he asks. You may not trust that friendship. He will cast it off as he does his worn out coat. Friendship is not now, and never was, the offspring of debauchery or unrighteousness. I ask you young women to believe me further when I say that any young man who demands your chastity as the price of his love is spiritually unclean, and is offering something that is not worth the purchase price. His love will turn to ashes under your touch; it will lead you to misery and shame, and too often, it will curse you with dread disease.

J. Reuben Clark (1871 - 1961)

Source: The Improvement Era, December, 1938, p. 714

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by J. Hawes on action, birth, character, good, honor, parenthood, principles, reward, talent, virtue, and wealth

A good character is, in all cases, the fruit of personal exertion. It is not inherited from parents; it is not created by external advantages; it is no necessary appendage of birth, wealth, talents, or station; but it is the result of one's own endeavors-the fruit and reward of good principles manifested in a course of virtuous and honorable action.

J. Hawes

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by J. Edgar Hoover on children, common sense, control, decisions, desires, facts, friendship, goals, good, harmony, humor, idealism, integrity, life, love, loyalty, needs, parenthood, security, sense of humor, stability, time, truth, understandin

Hoover, of the FBI, explained that juvenile delinquents seldom come from homes in which: Parents try to understand their children and find time to cultivate their friendship and love. Parents of integrity face facts and live by the truth. Parents live within their means and give their children examples in thrift, security, and stability. Parents are industrious and teach their children that most of life's good things come only from hard work. Parents have worthwhile goals in life and seek to have their children join them in their attainment. Parents have common sense , a capacity for friendship and a sense of humor. Parents live in harmony with each other and do not quarrel in presence of their children Parents have ideals and a compelling urge to serve rather than to be served. Parents are unswervingly loyal to their own children, but can express righteous indignation and chastise them when necessary. Parents decisions are controlled, not by what their children desire, but by what they need.

J. Edgar Hoover (1895 - 1972)

Source: Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Isaac Watts on earth, food, god, life, and parenthood

Earth, thou great footstool of our God, who reigns on high; thou fruitful source of all our raiment, life, and food; our house, our parent, and our nurse.

Isaac Watts (1674 - 1748)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Immanuel Kant on agreement, animals, beginning, certainty, hope, nature, parenthood, principles, relationships, science, simplicity, theory, and variety

Immanuel Kant, one of the most influential philosophers of the modern era, also presaged the feasibility of an evolutionary theory: The agreement of so many kinds of animals in a certain common structure, which seems to be fundamental not only in their skeletons, but also in the arrangement of the other parts - so that a wonderfully simple typical form, by the shortening and lengthening of some parts, and by the suppression and development of others, might be able to produce an immense variety of species - allows a ray of hope, however faint, to enter our minds, that here perhaps some result may be obtained, by the application of the principle of the mechanism of nature (without which there can be no natural science in general). This analogy of forms, which with all their differences seem to have been produced in accordance with a common prototype, strengthens our suspicions of an actual blood-relationship between them in their derivation from a common parent through the gradual approximation of one class of animals to another - beginning with the one in which the principle of purposiveness seems to be best authenticated, ie. man, and extending down to the polyps, and from these even down to mosses and lichens, and arriving finally at raw matter, the lowest stage of nature observable by us.

Immanuel Kant (1724 - 1804)

Source: Critique of Judgment, 1790

Contributed by: Zaady

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