parenthood

A Quote by Anthony Dymoke Powell on children, disappointment, parenthood, and promises

Parents. . . are sometimes a bit of a disappointment to their children. They don't fulfil the promise of their early years.

Anthony Dymoke Powell (1905 - 2000)

Source: Stringham, in A Buyer's Market, 1952; 2nd in the novel sequence, A Dance to the Music of Time

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Angela Carter on bankers, emotion, life, and parenthood

We do not go to bed in single pairs; even if we choose not to refer to them, we still drag there with us the cultural impedimenta of our social class, our parents' lives, our bank balances, our sexual and emotional expectations, our whole biographies-all the bits and pieces of our unique existences.

Angela Carter (1940 - 1992)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anacreon on brothers, love, money, parenthood, and war

Cursed be he above all others Who's enslaved by love of money. Money takes the place of brothers, Money takes the place of parents, Money brings us war and slaughter.

Anacreon (c. 568 - 478 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Adler on danger, lies, parenthood, and truth

If ever we hear a case of lying, we must look for a severe parents. A lie would have no sense unless the truth were felt as dangerous.

Alfred Adler (1870 - 1937)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alan Bennett on art, children, circumstances, losing, parenthood, and time

I was an only child. I lost both my parents. By the time I was twenty I was bald. I'm homosexual. In the way of circumstances and background to transcend I had everything an artist could possibly want. It was practically a blueprint.

Alan Bennett (1934 -)

Source: Leslie Halliwell, in Prick up Your Ears: The Screenplay, 1987.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aeschylus on laws and parenthood

'Reverence for parents' stands written among the three laws of most revered righteousness.

Aeschylus (525 - 456 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on hypocrisy, mercy, murder, and parenthood

Hypocrite: The man who murdered his parents, and then pleaded for mercy on the grounds that he was an orphan.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

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