painting

A Quote by John Ball on painting

From a painting: We have the payne and traveyle, the rayne and the wynd in the fieldes.

John Ball

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Adams on agriculture, architecture, children, history, liberty, mathematics, music, order, painting, philosophy, poetry, politics, sons, study, and war

I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. My sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history, naval architecture, navigation, commerce and agriculture in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry, and porcelain.

John Adams (1735 - 1826)

Source: Letter to Abigail Adams, May 12, 1780.

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A Quote by John Adams on agriculture, architecture, art, children, duty, government, history, liberty, mathematics, negotiation, order, painting, philosophy, poetry, politics, science, sons, study, war, and wives

The Science of Government it is my duty to study, more than all other Sciences: the Art of Legislation and Administration and Negotiation, ought to take place, indeed to exclude in a manner all other Arts.-I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study Mathematics and Philosophy. My sons ought to study Mathematics and Philosophy, Geography, natural History, Naval Architecture, navigation, Commerce and Agriculture, in order to give their Children a right to study Painting, Poetry, Musick, Architecture, Statuary, Tapestry and Porcelaine. This letter has not been dated precisely, but appears to have been written after Adams's letter to his wife on May 12, and before one written to her on May 15.

John Adams (1735 - 1826)

Source: letter to Abigail Adams, after May 12, 1780.—Adams Family Correspondence, ed. L. H. Butterfield, vol. 3, p. 342 (1973).

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Russell Lowell on beauty, day, nature, and painting

Nature is painting for us, day after day, pictures of infinite beauty.

James Lowell (1819 - 1891)

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A Quote by James Russell Lowell on music, painting, poetry, silence, thought, time, and wishes

Whoever can endure unmixed delight, whoever can tolerate music and painting and poetry all in one, whoever wishes to be rid of thought and to let the busy anvils of the brain be silent for a time, let him read in the "Faery Queen."

James Lowell (1819 - 1891)

Source: Spenser.

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A Quote by James Keller on art, awards, funerals, museums, painting, time, and work

The Metropolitan Museum of Art some time ago held a display of contemporary art at which $52,000 was awarded to American sculptors, painters, and artists in allied fields. The award for the best painting went to the canvas of an Illinois artist. It was described as "a macabre, detailed work showing a closed door bearing a funeral wreath." Equally striking was the work's title: "That which I should have done, I did not do."

James Keller

Source: Three Minutes by James Keller, M. M., 1950

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A Quote by James Keller on christ, garden, heart, painting, work, and world

In Holman Hunt's painting, "The Light of the World, "Christ is shown in a garden at midnight, holding a lantern in His left hand. With His right hand He is knocking on a heavily paneled door. When the painting was unveiled, a critic remarked to the painter, "Mr. Hunt, the work is unfinished. There is no handle on the door." "That," Hunt answered, "is the door to the human heart. It can be opened only from the inside."

James Keller

Source: Three Minutes by James Keller, M. M., 1950

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A Quote by James Keller on art, day, fatherhood, giving, indifference, life, love, neighbors, painting, sons, struggle, tears, thought, work, and world

Paul Cézanne never knew that he was later to be considered "the father of modern painting." Because of his great love for his work, he never thought of recognition. He struggled for thirty-five years, living in oblivion at Aix, giving away masterpieces to indifferent neighbors. And then one day a discerning Paris dealer happened upon his canvases and, gathering several of them, presented the Cézanne exhibit. The great of the art world were stunned: here, indeed, was a master! And Cézanne himself was no less astonished. Arriving at the gallery on the arm of his son, he gazed wonderingly at his paintings, and tears came to his eyes. "Look," he whispered, "they've framed them!"

James Keller

Source: Three Minutes by James Keller, M. M., 1950

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A Quote by Hugh B. Brown on art, change, children, christ, cities, day, greed, heart, home, labor, life, lust, mankind, men, painting, sons, trouble, wine, and work

An old priest told me this story. "Centuries ago a great artist was engaged to paint a mural for the cathedral in a Sicilian town. The subject was the life of Christ. For many years the artist labored diligently, and finally the painting was finished except for the two most important figures: the Christ Child and Judas Iscariot. He searched far and wide for suitable models. "One day while walking in the city he came upon some children playing in the street. Among them was a 12-year-old boy whose face stirred the painter's heart. "The artist took the child home with him, and day after day the boy sat patiently until the face of the Christ Child was finished. But the painter still had found no model for the portrait of Judas. "The story of the unfinished masterpiece spread afar, and many men, fancying themselves of wicked countenance, offered to pose for Judas. But in vain the old painter looked for Judas, as he envisioned him-a man warped by life, enfeebled by surrender to greed and lust. "Then one afternoon as he sat in a tavern, a gaunt and tattered figure staggered across the threshold. 'Wine, wine,' he begged. The startled painter looked into a face that seemed to bear the marks of every sin of mankind. "Greatly excited, the old painter said, 'Come with me, and I will give you wine.' "For many days the painter worked feverishly to complete his masterpiece. As the work went on, a change came over the model. A strange tension replaced the stuporous languor, and his bloodshot eyes were fixed with horror on the painted likeness of himself. One day, perceiving his subject's agitation, the painter paused in his work. 'My son,' he said, 'what troubles you so?' "The man buried his face in his hands, sobbing. After a long moment he lifted pleading eyes to the old painter's face. "'Do you not then remember me? Years ago I was your model for the Christ Child.'"

Hugh B. Brown (1883 - 1975)

Source: The Abundant Life, p.228, quoting an article by Bonnie Chamberlin printed in Saturday Review

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Grandma Anna Mary Robertson Moses on painting

If I didn't start painting, I would have raised chickens

Grandma Moses (1860 - 1961)

Contributed by: Zaady

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