newspapers

A Quote by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov on cosmetics, honesty, justice, newspapers, pleasure, virtue, and wishes

A litterateur is not a confectioner, not a dealer in cosmetics, not an entertainer. . . . He is just like an ordinary reporter. What would you say if a newspaper reporter, because of his fastidiousness or from a wish to give pleasure to his readers, were to describe only honest mayors, high-minded ladies, and virtuous railroad contractors.

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860 - 1904)

Source: The Personal Papers of Anton Chekhov, Lear, 1950.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on literature, newspapers, and work

SERIAL, n. A literary work, usually a story that is not true, creeping through several issues of a newspaper or magazine.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on life and newspapers

PILLORY, n. A mechanical device for inflicting personal distinction - prototype of the modern newspaper conducted by persons of austere virtues and blameless lives.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on mountains, newspapers, and tourists

OLYMPIAN, adj. Relating to a mountain in Thessaly, once inhabited by gods, now a repository of yellowing newspapers, beer bottles and mutilated sardine cans, attesting the presence of the tourist and his appetite.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on newspapers and popularity

LODGER, n. A less popular name for the Second Person of that delectable newspaper Trinity, the Roomer, the Bedder, and the Mealer.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on independence and newspapers

LICKSPITTLE, n. A useful functionary, not infrequently found editing a newspaper . . . the lickspittle is only the blackmailer under another aspect, although the latter is frequently found as an independent species.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alvin R. Dyer on conquest, day, earth, education, god, newspapers, science, scientists, and trust

When the Russians succeeded in putting the first satellite into orbit, one of their scientists is reported to have said, "Now that we have conquered space, our next conquest is that of man." An American anthropologist, Leslie A. White, of the University of Michigan, is reported in a Detroit newspaper as saying, "A cultural system which can launch earth satellites can dispense with Gods entirely." This is a great day for the false scientist-they who have left God out of their education. Of these the Apostle Paul even in his day warned his weakening convert, Timothy, to beware of: O Timothy, keep that which is committed to thy trust, avoiding profane and vain babblings, and oppositions of science falsely so called. (I Timothy 6 :20.)

Alvin R. Dyer (1903 - 1977)

Source: at BYU, April 7, 1964

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on defeat, democracy, elections, laughter, newspapers, presidency, and speech

He said that he felt "like the boy that stumped his toe,-'it hurt too bad to laugh, and he was too big to cry.'" Attributed to Abraham Lincoln by John T. Morse, Jr., Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 149 (1893), referring to Lincoln's defeat by Senator Stephen Douglas in the 1858 senatorial campaign in Illinois. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, November 22, 1862, p. 131, attributed this reply to President Lincoln, when asked how he felt about the result of the New York election (where the Democratic candidate won the governorship]: "Somewhat like that boy in Kentucky, who stubbed his toe while running to see his sweetheart. The boy said he was too big to cry, and far too badly hurt to laugh." Adlai Stevenson told this story in his nationally-televised concession speech after the 1952 presidential election: "Someone asked me, as I came in, down on the street, how I felt, and I was reminded of a story that a fellow-townsman of ours used to tell-Abraham Lincoln. They asked him how he felt once after an unsuccessful election. He said that he was too old to cry, but it hurt too much to laugh."-The Papers of Adlai E. Stevenson, ed. Walter Johnson, vol. 4, p. 188 (1974). The speech was delivered at the Leland Hotel Springfield, Illinois, in the early hours of November 5, 1952.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

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