nature

A Quote by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi on consciousness, life, nature, and possibility

Consciousness is the basis of all life and the field of all possibilities.  Its nature is to expand and unfold its full potential.  The impulse to evolve is thus inherent in the very nature of life.

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi

Source: Mahesh Prasad Varma

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by Robert M. Sapolsky on compassion, nature, and science

I love science, and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awed by nature.

Robert Sapolsky

Source: Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by Sally Carrighar on blue, music, and nature

I held a blue flower in my hand, probably a wild aster, wondering what its name was, and then thought that human names for natural things are superfluous.  Nature herself does not name them.  The important thing is to know this flower, look at its color until the blueness becomes as real as a keynote of music.

Sally Carrighar

Source: Home to the Wilderness

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by Barry Lopez on dream, nature, and place

One of the great dreams of a man must be to find some place between the extremes of nature and civilization where it is possible to live without regret.

Barry Lopez

Source: Earthly Words: Essays on Contemporary American Nature & Environmental Writers

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by Jiddu Krishnamurti on love, everything, extraordinary thing, nature, beauty, jiddu krishnamurthi, beyond violence, and books

If you have this extraordinary thing going in your life, then it is everything; then you become the teacher, the disciple, the neighbour, the beauty of the cloud -- you are all that, and that is love.

Jiddu Krishnamurti

Source: Beyond Violence

Contributed by: Mila

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, life, character, nature, society, wholes, value-judgments, values, discrimination, intelligence, options, and will

As Kierkegaard insisted from his theistic perspective, so Nietzsche also argues from his naturalistic one: whoever accepts the whole must accept as well the negative, resented, embittering, contrary elements in that whole. If life and character and nature and society truly are wholes, then everything in them is in some way essential to that whole; and we cannot grasp that whole by means of value-judgments if values are INHERENTLY DISCRIMINATORY or divisive functions of our intelligence. Values drive rifts between options, they exist for the sake of the natural powers of the will which (so to speak) needs its food cut up into willable portions or differentiated options.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, character, modernity, scientism, capitalism, truth, nature, culture, ideology, egalitarianism, hierarchicalism, libertarianism, values, principles, preconceptions, and logic

The worldview of modern scientism and capitalism are profoundly wrongheaded, rooted in an artificialism and arbitrarialism that cannot begin to see the primordial truth of the way nature actually works, in animals and in ourselves as well. All modern culture and ideology that try to disestablish these principles -- radical egalitarianism, capitalist or bourgeois materialist-artificialist hierarchicalism, arbitrarial libertarianism, etc. -- are flying in the face of the headwinds of both nature and values, the tides of human nature and human character. But these ideologies' fallacies are incomprehensible to them just because their culture systematically prohibits them from thinking about issues at the level of structural principles, of ultimate preconceptions: nothing but good pedestrian mechanical bourgeois logic, as remote as it can possibly be from philosophy.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, values, differences, oppositions, perspectives, issues, polemics, hierarchies, illusions, delusions, judgments, superiority, inferiority, rationality, objectivity, hierarchicalism, preferences, idiotia, aristeia, a

Values by their very nature tend to seed differences and oppositions, i.e. to make it possible for us to detect and appreciate the various perspectives from which issues may be seen; even though we (by a profound self-misconception) may find this psychologically and socially unpleasant, for the sake of value-intelligence we must learn to live and to thrive AMIDST such polemics, "in medias res," in utmost self-uncertainty and insecurity. Values, also by their inherent character and natural function, tend to form hierarchies; and even though our egos and appetites and illusions and delusions may resent being afflicted with judgments of rank and superiority/inferiority, again for the sake of connoisseurial and wisdom-seeking value-intelligence we have to stretch and traumatize our minds aristically to understand the rationality and objectivity of such intrinsic hierarchicalism, valid and authoritative over and beyond all that we may have cultivated as our idiosyncratic and subjectivist preferences (idiotia). Aristeia is naturally ingrained in the very nature of values; values are naturally ingrained in the very character and laws of nature.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, truth, and nature

Hegel understood the Heisenbergian reality of knowing: yes, it would be nice if we could somehow delicately capture the truth and bring it closer to ourselves without altering it, "like a bird caught with a limestick." But the reality is, every truth we manage to know is altered, deformed by our very "encheiresis naturae," by the act of our taking-in-hand of nature (to borrow the alchemists' phrase from Goethe's Faust).

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

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