names

A Quote by Eric Hoffer on change, common sense, existence, familiarity, names, people, possibility, practicality, and prophets

The well adjusted make poor prophets. A pleasant existence blinds us to the possibilities of drastic change. We cling to what we call our common sense, our practical point of view. Actually, these are names for an all-absorbing familiarity with things as they are. . . . Thus it happens that when the times become unhinged, it is the practical people who are caught unaware . . . still clinging to things that no longer exist.

Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Elbert Green Hubbard on argument, losing, and names

If you can't answer a man's argument, all is not lost; you can still call him vile names.

Elbert Hubbard (1856 - 1915)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Elbert Green Hubbard on argument, losing, and names

If you can not answer a man's argument, all it not lost; you can still call him vile names.

Elbert Hubbard (1856 - 1915)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edmund Burke on affection and names

My hold of the colonies is in the close affection which grows from common names, from kindred blood, from similar privileges, and equal protection. These are ties which, though light as air, are as strong as links of iron.

Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)

Source: Speech, Conciliation w America, 22 Mar. 1775

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edgar Quinet on cities, generations, names, peace, and time

Today as in the time of Pliny and Columella, the hyacinth flourishes in Wales, the periwinkle in Illyria, the daisy on the ruins of Numantia; while around them cities have changed their masters and their names, collided and smashed, disappeared into nothingness, their peaceful generations have crossed down the ages as fresh and smiling as on the days of battle.

Edgar Quinet (1803 - 1875)

Source: Philosophy of Human History, 1825

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Douglas Jerrold on conformity, love, names, self-reliance, and virtue

The virtue in most request is conformity. Self-reliance is its aversion. It loves not realities and creators, but names and customs.

Douglas Jerrold (1803 - 1857)

Source: Self-Reliance.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Douglas Jerrold on love and names

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Love not the flower they pluck and know it not, And all their botany is Latin names.

Douglas Jerrold (1803 - 1857)

Source: Blight.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by David S. Slawson on culture, majorities, names, order, people, perception, and society

Names are an important key to what a society values. Anthropologists recognize naming as 'one of the chief methods for imposing order on perception.' What is not named in a culture very likely goes unnoticed by the majority of its people. The converse is also true: people pay greater attention to things that been given names.

David S. Slawson

Source: Secret Teachings in the Art of Japanese Gardens, 1987

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marcus Tullius Cicero on books, contempt, desires, glory, inspiration, motivation, names, and praise

We are motivated by a keen desire for praise, and the better a man is the more he is inspired by glory. The very philosophers themselves, even in those books which they write in contempt of glory, inscribe their names.

Cicero (106 - 43 BC)

Source: Tusculanes Disputationes, 44 B.C.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Edward Ives on argument, attitude, conventionality, expectation, good, kindness, life, music, musicians, names, and time

Reber [Johnson; a violinist] also got off another one, after I'd played over the Second Violin Sonata for him-that harmless piece. "After stuff like that"-he said-"if you consider that music, and like it, how can you like Brahms or any good music?" That is a very common attitude among almost all the well known lilies. They take it [i.e., that attitude] for granted-a kind of self-evident axiom, a settled-for-life matter, ipso facto, admitting of no argument. The classical is good for all time, the modern is bad for all time-so if you like one, you can't like the other. Describing the reaction of a typical professional musician to his, and other twentieth-century, compositions. "Lilies" was one of Ives' names for most of the concert goers of his era, who expected all music to be conventional and pretty.

Charles Ives (1874 - 1951)

Contributed by: Zaady

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