myth

A Quote by Willard Van Orman Quine on existence, justice, laws, myth, and truth

Just as the introduction of the irrational numbers ... is a convenient myth [which] simplifies the laws of arithmetic ... so physical objects are postulated entities which round out and simplify our account of the flux of existence... The conceptional scheme of physical objects is [likewise] a convenient myth, simpler than the literal truth and yet containing that literal truth as a scattered part.

Willard Van Orman Quine (1908 -)

Source: J. Koenderink Solid Shape, Cambridge Mass.: MIT Press, 1990.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Wilfred Owen on death, heaven, laughter, life, murder, myth, and soldiers

The Young Soldier It is not death Without hereafter To one in dearth Of life and its laughter, Nor the sweet murder Dealt slow and even Unto the martyr Smiling at heaven: It is the smile Faint as a (waning) myth, Faint, and exceeding small On a boy's murdered mouth.

Wilfred Owen (1893 - 1918)

Source: The Young Soldier

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Warren G. Bennis on certainty, danger, facts, leadership, myth, nonsense, opposites, and people

The most dangerous leadership myth is that leaders are born-that there is a genetic factor to leadership. This myth asserts that people simply either have certain charismatic qualities or not. That's nonsense; in fact, the opposite is true. Leaders are made rather than born.

Warren G. Bennis (1925 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ursula K. Le Guin on change, destruction, ethics, heroism, joy, life, mystery, myth, poets, reason, and religion

True myths may serve for thousands of years as an inexhaustible source of intellectual speculation, religious joy, ethical inquiry, and artistic renewal. The real mystery is not destroyed by reason. The fake one is. You look at it and it vanishes. You look at the Blonde Hero--really look--and he turns into a gerbil. But you look at Apollo, and he looks back at you. The poet Rilke looked at a statue of Apollo about fifty years ago, and Apollo spoke to him. "You must change your life," he said. When the true myth rises into consciousness, that is always its message. You must change your life.

Ursula K. Le Guin (1929 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Terence Kealey on america, computers, country, decisions, economics, electricity, future, generations, government, growth, losing, money, myth, power, projects, research, science, service, success, war, wealth, and world

There is a central myth about British science and economic growth, and it goes like this: science breeds wealth, Britain is in economic decline, therefore Britain has not done enough science. Actually, it is easy to show that a key cause of Britain's economic decline has been that the government has funded too much science. . . . Post-war British science policy illustrates the folly of wasting money on research. The government decided, as it surveyed the ruins of war-torn Europe in 1945, that the future lay in computers, nuclear power and jet aircraft, so successive administrations poured money into these projects-to vast technical success. The world's first commercial mainframe computer was British, sold by Ferrranti in 1951; the world's first commercial jet aircraft was British, the Comet, in service in 1952; the first nuclear power station was British, Calder Hall, commissioned in 1956; and the world's first and only supersonic commercial jet aircraft was Anglo-French, Concorde, in service in 1976. Yet these technical advances crippled us economically, because they were so uncommercial. The nuclear generation of electricity, for example, had lost 2.1 billion pounds by 1975 (2.1 billion pounds was a lot then); Concord had lost us, alone, 2.3 billion pounds by 1976; the Comet crashed and America now dominates computers. Had these vast sums of money not been wasted on research, we would now be a significantly richer country.

Terence Kealey

Source: Terence Kealey Wasting Billions, the Scientific Way, The Sunday Times, Oct. 13, 1996.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stuart Kauffman on creation, expectation, failure, life, myth, order, potential, simplicity, theory, thought, understanding, and water

If biologists have ignored self-organization, it is not because self-ordering is not pervasive and profound. It is because we biologists have yet to understand how to think about systems governed simultaneously by two sources of order, Yet who seeing the snowflake, who seeing simple lipid molecules cast adrift in water forming themselves into cell-like hollow lipid vesicles, who seeing the potential for the crystallization of life in swarms of reacting molecules, who seeing the stunning order for free in networks linking tens upon tens of thousands of variables, can fail to entertain a central thought: if ever we are to attain a final theory in biology, we will surely, surely have to understand the commingling of self-organization and selection. We will have to see that we are the natural expressions of a deeper order. Ultimately, we will discover in our creation myth that we are expected after all.

Stuart Kauffman

Source: Stuart Kauffman At Home in the Universe, Oxford University Press, 1995, p 112.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Steve Perry on bravery, business, children, day, doubt, heart, learning, life, motherhood, myth, reality, simplicity, ugliness, and work

Did that myth at the heart of all the fairy tales her mother had told her, that part about happily ever after, ever really work out that way? How many children around the galaxy had been given that pretty picture, had swallowed it entire, only to grow up and find that reality was not so simple, not so beautiful, not so easy? The story didn't end when the brave princess killed the wicked queen and rescued the prince. That, she was learning, was the easy part. The hard part came when the guns were cleaned and reholstered, the bodies of the villains cremated, and the day-to-day business of life reared its ugly cobra's head and grinned down at you. When your prince had doubts you couldn't answer for him, when you had doubts he could only shrug at, that, that was the hard part. That was the part the stories hadn't addressed.

Steve Perry

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Rush H. Limbaugh III on anger, elections, extremism, feeling, future, government, insecurity, kindness, majorities, media, men, myth, people, theory, thinking, uncertainty, unhappiness, voting, and women

The Myth of the Angry White Male What has sprung up is a strange kind of thinking. . . . Americans are unhappy with their lot. They are feeling insecure - layoffs and corporate downsizing have made their future uncertain. Stirred up by talk radio, the theory goes, large numbers of formerly sensible people have embraced 'hate' and 'extremism.' Most of these, according to the media, are white guys. A Washington Post/ABC pre-election poll asked voters if they were angry 'about the way the federal government works.' Four out of five white males said no. 62 percent of white men voted for Republican House candidates (38 percent for Democrats in 1994, a ten-point increase from the 1990 midterm elections). But was this special to their gender? In 1994 white women voted for Republican House candidates by a 55 to 45 percent majority. Significantly, there isn't single article decrying 'angry white females.'

Rush Limbaugh (1951 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Rush H. Limbaugh III on america, belief, commitment, community, crime, evil, liberals, life, myth, people, poverty, protest, and reality

Regarding the "Poverty Equals Crime" Myth: Liberals believe that crime is inextricably linked with poverty. In reality, most poor people never resort to crime, and some wealthy people commit evil acts to enrich themselves further. Harlem, East Los Angeles, the South side of Chicago are not the poorest communities in the United States. According to a new U.S. Bureau of the Census report, the poorest communities are Shannon County, South Dakota, followed by Starr, Texas, and Tunica, Mississippi. Have you ever heard of these residents rioting to protest their living conditions?

Rush Limbaugh (1951 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Rush H. Limbaugh III on commitment, crime, liberals, logic, myth, people, poverty, reason, and work

Regarding the "Poverty Equals Crime" Myth: Liberals state that many teenagers would rather sell crack for $100 an hour than to flip hamburgers for a minimum wage. Using the same liberal logic, you might think it would make more sense for the average middle-class worker to rob banks rather than work a forty-hour week? The reason why most people, rich and poor, do not commit crimes because they know it is wrong to do so.

Rush Limbaugh (1951 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

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