museums

A Quote by unknown on country, food, jobs, life, love, museums, painting, people, sleep, wives, and work

Why go to a museum and look at paintings if you can paint your own painting. I mean, do things for yourself. I mean, do you have somebody come in a sleep with your wife for you? Do you pay somebody to eat your food for you? I mean, do things for yourself. That's what life's about. There's so many people doing things they hate, I mean you have people running the country who all they care about is keeping their jobs - not doing their jobs. There's so little real love in any of the work that I see.

unknown

Source: What Happened Was . . .

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Archer Hirst on change, garden, life, museums, and society

10th August 1851: On Tuesday evening at Museum, at a ball in the gardens. The night was chill, I dropped too suddenly from Differential Calculus into ladies' society, and could not give myself freely to the change. After an hour's attempt so to do, I returned, cursing the mode of life I was pursuing; next morning I had already shaken hands, however, with Diff. Calculus, and forgot the ladies....

Thomas Archer Hirst

Source: J. Helen Gardner and Robin J. Wilson, "Thomas Archer Hirst - Mathematician Xtravagant II - Student Days in Germany", The American Mathematical Monthly , v. 6, no. 100.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Steven Wright on museums

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I went to a museum where they had all the heads and arms from all the statues in the other museums.

Steven Wright (1955 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard L. Evans on creativity, fame, gifts, lies, life, museums, principles, service, teaching, theory, thinking, time, and work

I am thinking of the Danish sculptor of great fame, Thorvaldsen, who chose to be buried in the midst of his work-not in a cathedral or a cemetery, but in a museum among the monuments of his own making- in the midst of his statuary; and there what he made and what he did with his life surrounds him. He did not theorize upon sculpturing, only, but with his hands and with his creative gift he fashioned those things and he lies there in the midst of his works, as we all shall do someday-and it will not be the theories or the discussions or the speculations or the set of principles or the set of commandments that shall save us. We shall be no better than we are. We are no better than the tithing we pay, no better than the teaching we do, no better than the service we give, no better than the commandments we keep, no better than the lives we live, and we shall have a bright remembrance of these things and we shall, in a sense, lie down in the midst of what we have done when that time comes.

Richard L. Evans (1906 - 1971)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Pablo Ruiz Picasso on museums

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Give me a museum and I'll fill it.

Pablo Picasso (1881 - 1973)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Julia Margaret Cameron on art, commitment, life, losing, mind, museums, and soul

The clock is ticking and you're hearing the beat. You stop by a museum shop, sign your name on a scuba-diving sheet, and commit yourself to Saturday mornings in the deep end. You're either losing your mind - or gaining your soul. Life is meant to be an artist date. That's why we were created.

Julia Margaret Cameron (1815 - 1879)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Ronald Reuel "J. R. R." Tolkien on affection, certainty, gold, magic, museums, and secrets

His sword he hung over the mantelpiece. His coat of mail was arranged on a stand in the hall (until he lent it to a Museum) His gold and silver was largely spent in presents, both useful and extravagent - which to a certain extent accounts for the affection of his nephews and his nieces. His magic ring he kept a great secret, for he chiefly used it when unpleasant callers came!

J.R.R. Tolkien (1892 - 1973)

Source: The Hobbit

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Quincy Adams on age, anticipation, charity, design, gifts, greatness, history, knowledge, mankind, men, museums, perseverance, simplicity, and spirit

Of all the foundations of establishments for pious or charitable uses, which ever signalized the spirit of the age, or the comprehensive beneficence of the founder, none can be named more deserving of the approbation of mankind than this. Should it be faithfully carried into effect, with an earnestness and sagacity of application, and a steady perseverance of pursuit, proportioned to the means furnished by the will of the founder, and to the greatness and simplicity of his design as by himself declared, "the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men," it is no extravagance of anticipation to declare, that his name will be hereafter enrolled among the eminent benefactors of mankind. . . . Whoever increases his knowledge, multiplies the uses to which he is enabled to turn the gift of his Creator. This passage, in a slightly altered form, is inscribed on the exterior of the National Museum of American History, Washington, D.C.: "Of all the foundations of establishments for pious or charitable uses which ever signalized the spirit of the age or the comprehensive beneficence of the founder none can be named more deserving of the approbation of mankind than the Smithsonian Institution. Should it be faithfully carried into effect with an earnestness and sagacity of application. . . proportioned to the means furnished by the will of the founder and to the greatness and simplicity of his design as by himself declared, 'The increase and diffusion of knowledge among men,' his name will be hereafter enrolled among the eminent benefactors of mankind. . . whoever increases knowledge multiplies the uses to which he is able to turn the gift of his creator.

John Quincy Adams (1767 - 1848)

Source: House Report 181, pp.2 &3, January 19, 1836, and William J. Rhees, The Smithsonian Institution: Documents Relative to Its Origin and History, 1835-1899, vol. 1, pp. 131-32 (1901).

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Keller on art, awards, funerals, museums, painting, time, and work

The Metropolitan Museum of Art some time ago held a display of contemporary art at which $52,000 was awarded to American sculptors, painters, and artists in allied fields. The award for the best painting went to the canvas of an Illinois artist. It was described as "a macabre, detailed work showing a closed door bearing a funeral wreath." Equally striking was the work's title: "That which I should have done, I did not do."

James Keller

Source: Three Minutes by James Keller, M. M., 1950

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Carl Gustav Jung on museums

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The heaping together of paintings by Old Masters in museums is a catastrophe; likewise, a collection of a hundred Great Brains makes one big fathead.

Carl Jung (1875 - 1961)

Source: Civilization in Transition (1934)

Contributed by: Zaady

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