motives

A Quote by George Eliot on cruelty, motives, opportunity, and vices

Cruelty, like every other vice, requires no motive outside of itself; it only requires opportunity.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on life and motives

What makes life dreary is the want of a motive.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Daniel Deronda.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Bernard Shaw on force, motives, religion, understanding, and world

Religion is a great force - the only real motive force in the world; but what you fellows don't understand is that you must get at a man through his own religion and not through yours.

George Bernard Shaw (1856 - 1950)

Source: Getting Married, 1908

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A Quote by G. Walter Fiske on challenge, character, conscience, discontent, good, guidance, idealism, imagination, judgment, life, motives, nobility, power, progress, vision, and world

An IDEAL is a vision of the Ought-To-Be - some good to be attained. . . . An ideal is a challenge to a better life. First we must see it in imagination; then we must long to make it a part of ourselves; then we shall guide our conduct by it, we shall live it. An ideal is both light and power. It is light for conscience and motive-power for will. It is a standard by which we judge between right and wrong. When we see a noble ideal lived out in another's life, it gives us a holy discontent with ourselves until we make it our own and it makes more beautiful and strong our own character. This is the way of all progress, as the world grows better, for there is no progress without ideals. . . .

G. Walter Fiske

Source: quoted by Loyd J. Ericson from G. Walter Fiske, Jesus’ Ideals of Living, Abingdon Press, 1922

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A Quote by Freeman Dyson on animals, cities, civilization, climate, consequences, darkness, dependence, good, greatness, history, horses, ideas, inventions, life, motives, needs, power, simplicity, technology, and theory

The technologies which have had the most profound effects on human life are usually simple. A good example of a simple technology with profound historical consequences is hay. Nobody knows who invented hay, the idea of cutting grass in the autumn and storing it in large enough quantities to keep horses and cows alive through the winter. All we know is that the technology of hay was unknown to the Roman Empire but was known to every village of medieval Europe. Like many other crucially important technologies, hay emerged anonymously during the so-called Dark Ages. According to the Hay Theory of History, the invention of hay was the decisive event which moved the center of gravity of urban civilization from the Mediterranean basin to Northern and Western Europe. The Roman Empire did not need hay because in a Mediterranean climate the grass grows well enough in winter for animals to graze. North of the Alps, great cities dependent on horses and oxen for motive power could not exist without hay. So it was hay that allowed populations to grow and civilizations to flourish among the forests of Northern Europe. Hay moved the greatness of Rome to Paris and London, and later to Berlin and Moscow and New York.

Freeman Dyson

Source: Freeman Dyson Infinite in All Directions, Harper and Row, New York, 1988, p 135.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Eric Hoffer on ability, action, direction, ideas, men, motives, passion, people, politics, society, and thought

The link between ideas and action is rarely direct. There is almost always an intermediate step in which the idea is overcome. De Tocqueville points out that it is at times when passions start to govern human affairs that ideas are most obviously translated into political action. The translation of ideas into action is usually in the hands of people least likely to follow rational motives. Hence, it is that action is often the nemesis of ideas, and sometimes of the men who formulate them. One of the marks of the truly vigorous society is the ability to dispense with passion as a midwife of action - the ability to pass directly from thought to action.

Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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A Quote by Edwin Hubble Chapin on motivation and motives

Motivation::"Whatever touches the nerves of motive, whatever shifts man's moral position, is mightier than steam, or calorie, or lightening.

Edwin Hubble Chapin (1814 - 1880)

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A Quote by Ed Pinegar on christ, faith, love, motives, obedience, power, reason, and spirit

Faith is the power. Love is the motive. Obedience is the price. The Spirit is the key. And Christ is the reason.

Ed Pinegar

Source: Mark and Barbara Hall Collection.

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A Quote by François, Duc de La Rochefoucauld on action and motives

However brilliant an action, it should not be esteemed great unless the result of a great motive.

Duc de La Rochefoucauld (1613 - 1680)

Source: Réflexions ou Sentences et Maximes Morales

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A Quote by François, Duc de La Rochefoucauld on deed, good, motives, and people

We would frequently be ashamed of our good deeds if people saw all of the motives that produced them.

Duc de La Rochefoucauld (1613 - 1680)

Source: Réflexions ou Sentences et Maximes Morales

Contributed by: Zaady

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