motherhood

A Quote by Rita Rudner on motherhood

Neurotics build castles in the air, psychotics live in them. My mother cleans them.

Rita Rudner

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Franck on art, imitation, inventions, motherhood, nature, and necessity

Art imitates Nature, and necessity is the mother of invention.

Richard Franck

Source: Northern Memoirs (written in 1658, printed in 1694).

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on achievement, effort, enthusiasm, and motherhood

Enthusiasm is the mother of effort, and without it nothing great was ever achieved.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on men and motherhood

Men are what their mothers made them.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Source: Essays. Compensation

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on children and motherhood

There never was a child so lovely but his mother wasn't glad to get him asleep.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Plato on inventions, motherhood, and necessity

Necessity, who is the mother of invention.

Plato (c.427 - 347 BC)

Source: The Republic. Book II. 369C

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Phyllis McGinley on bravery, courage, god, motherhood, nature, needs, parenthood, patience, praise, soul, and tolerance

God knows that a mother needs fortitude and courage and tolerance and flexibility and patience and firmness and nearly every other brave aspect of the human soul. But because I happen to be a parent of almost fiercely maternal nature, I praise casualness. It seems to me the rarest of virtues.

Phyllis McGinley (1905 - 1978)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Phyllis McGinley on borrowing, brides, children, christianity, fame, family, fatherhood, faults, generosity, gold, hunger, love, luck, motherhood, patience, poetry, problems, relatives, saints, sharing, sister, soul, thinking, and wine

The subject of the poem was Bridget of Kildare (450-523), a Christian lass among the Druids in Ireland. Saint Bridget was A problem child. Although a lass Demure and mild, And one who strove To please her dad, Saint Bridget drove The family mad. For here's the fault in Bridget lay: She WOULD give everything away. To any soul Whose luck was out She'd give her bowl Of stirabout; She'd give her shawl, Divide her purse With one or all. And what was worse, When she ran out of things to give She'd borrow from a relative. Her father's gold, Her grandsire's dinner, She'd hand to cold and hungry sinner; Give wine, give meat, No matter whose; Take from her feet The very shoes, And when her shoes had gone to others, Fetch forth her sister's and her mother's. She could not quit. She had to share; Gave bit by bit The silverware, The barnyard geese, The parlor rug, Her little niece-'s christening mug, Even her bed to those in want, And then the mattress of her aunt. An easy touch For poor and lowly, She gave so much And grew so holy That when she died Of years and fame, The countryside Put on her name, And still the Isles of Erin fidget With generous girls named Bride or Bridget. Well, one must love her. Nonetheless, In thinking of her Givingness, There's no denial She must have been A sort of trial Unto her kin. The moral, too, seems rather quaint. WHO had the patience of a saint, From evidence presented here? Saint Bridget? Or her near and dear?

Phyllis McGinley (1905 - 1978)

Source: "The Giveaway," from The Love Letters ofd Phyllis McGinley, New York, Viking Press, 1957

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Phyllis Diller on laws, motherhood, and pain

My mother-in-law had a pain beneath her left breast. Turned out to be a trick knee.

Phyllis Diller

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Francesco Petrarca Petrarch on motherhood and variety

Sameness is the mother of disgust, variety the cure.

Petrarca Petrarch (1304 - 1374)

Contributed by: Zaady

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