mortality

A Quote by William Shakespeare on death, dreams, mortality, and sleep

To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 3, scene 1 (detail)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day, god, happiness, life, and mortality

O God! methinks it were a happy life, To be no better than a homely swain; To sit upon a hill, as I do now, To carve out dials, quaintly, point by point, Thereby to see the minutes how they run, How many make the hour full complete; How many hours bring about the day; How many days will finish up the year; How many years a mortal man may live.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Henry VI

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on boldness, honor, life, loyalty, men, mortality, reputation, and spirit

The purest treasure mortal times afford Is spotless reputation; that away, Men are but gilded loam or painted clay. A jewel in a ten-times-barr'd-up chest Is a bold spirit in a loyal breast. Mine honour is my life; both grow in one; Take honour from me, and my life is done.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Richard II

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on drugs, gold, mortality, murder, soul, and world

Gold is worse poison to a man's soul, doing more murders in this loathsome world, than any mortal drug.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William R. Bradford on difficulty, eternity, greed, happiness, ideas, impossibility, inspiration, judgment, justice, learning, life, mortality, needs, niceness, organize, perfection, salvation, separation, solution, starting, time, understandi

We give our lives to that which we give our time. I have learned that it is very difficult, if not impossible, to unclutter one's life by starting at the top of the pile with the idea that the solution is to just get things sorted and better organized. It is nice to get better organized, but that is not enough. Much has to be discarded. We must actually get rid of it. To do this we need to develop a list of basics, a list of those things that are indispensable to our mortal welfare and happiness and our eternal salvation. This list must follow the gospel pattern and contain the elements needed for our sanctification and perfection. It must be the product of inspiration and prayerful judgment between the things we really need and things we just want. It should separate need from greed. It must be our best understanding of those things that are important as opposed to those things that are just interesting.

William R. Bradford (1933 -)

Source: © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission..

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Butler Yeats on mortality and soul

An aged man is but a paltry thing, A tattered coat upon a stick, unless Soul clap its hands and sing, and louder sing For every tatter in its mortal dress.

William Butler Yeats (1865 - 1939)

Source: The Tower, 1928. Sailing to Byzantium

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Walter Savage Landor on friendship, gratitude, heart, misery, mortality, sacred, and sentimentality

In the hours of distress and misery, the eyes of every mortal turn to friendship; in the hours of gladness and conviviality, what is our want? It is friendship. When the heart overflows with gratitude, or with any other sweet or sacred sentiment, what is the word to which it would give utterance? A friend.

Walter Savage Landor (1775 - 1864)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Walter Lippmann on destruction, ideas, immortality, men, and mortality

The thinker dies, but his thoughts are beyond the reach of destruction. Men are mortal; but ideas are immortal.

Walter Lippmann (1889 - 1974)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on good, mortality, obstacles, proverbs, and reputation

The natives of the South Seas have a fabulous reputation of good seamanship. Nevertheless, there is an old Tongan proverb, "Koe make mangalongalo oku fakafoa vaka." (It is always the hidden reef that sinks a canoe.) So one finds it in mortality-the unforeseen obstacles are most apt to keep a traveler from receiving exaltation.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on best friend, bitterness, blindness, chance, children, day, defense, dependence, effort, failure, family, friendship, funny, good, gossip, happiness, heart, ideas, justice, laughter, life, love, mortality, pain, quiet, schools, shyne

Life wounds all of us. At best there is sorrow enough to go round. Yet because the deepest wounds are those of the soul and hidden to mortal sight, we keep hurting each other day by day, inflicting wounds that time mercifully scars over. But the scars remain, ready at a touch to throb angrily and ache again with the old gnawing wild pain. You remember that day in school when the teacher laughed? You were only a little fellow, shy and silent, sitting in the shadow of the big boys, wistfully looking toward the day when you would shine as they did. That day you were sure your chance had come. You were sure that you had just what the teacher wanted on the tip of your tongue, and you jumped up and shouted it out loudly and eagerly, triumphantly - and you were very, very wrong. There followed a flash of astonishment, an instant of dreadful silence, and then the room rang with mirth. You heard only the teacher's laughter, and it drowned your heart. Many years have gone over head since that day, but the sight of a little lad trudging along to school brings it back, and the old pain stirs and beats against the scar. You cover it over, hush it to quiet once more with a smile. "I must have been funny. She couldn't help it." But you wish she had. And there was that time when your best friend failed you. When the loose-tongued gossips started the damaging story and he was pressed for a single word in your defense, he said, "Oh, he's all right. Of course, he's all right, but I don't want to get mixed up in this thing. Can't afford it. Have to think of my own name and my own family, you understand. Good fellow, but I have to keep out of this." You felt forsaken. For weeks and weeks you carried the pain in your heart. The story was bad enough but would right itself. The idea that he should fail you, that he had not, rushed to your side at the first hint of trouble was bad enough, was unbearable. He came back again after it was all over, but the sight of him renewed the ache in your breast and the throb of pain in your throat. The scar was thin, and the hurt beneath it quivered. We all bear scars. Life is a struggle, and hurts must come. But why the unnecessary ones? Why hurt the souls of little children? Why say things to them that they must remember with pain all their lives? Why say the smart, tart thing that goes straight to the heart of someone we love because we would relieve ourselves of the day's tension and throw off a grain of the soul's bitterness? Who are we to inflict wounds and suffering and scars on those about us? Staggering, blind mortals, groping our way from somewhere "here" to somewhere "there" conscious of little but the effort to stay "here" a little longer! It behooves us to travel softly, regardful of one another's happiness, particularly where our path crosses that of those dependent upon us for comfort or enters into the heart of little children.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

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