morality

A Quote by William John Bennett on children, life, morality, power, and quiet

There is nothing more influential in a child's life than the moral power of quiet example. For children to take morality seriously they must see adults take morality seriously.

William John Bennett (1943 -)

Source: The Book of Virtues

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William James on careers, life, men, morality, and vanity

We are all potentially such sick men. The sanest and best of us are of one clay with lunatics and prison-inmates. And whenever we feel this, such a sense of the vanity of our voluntary career comes over us, that all our morality appears as a plaster hiding a sore it can never cure, and all our well-doing as the hollowest substitute for that well-being that our lives ought to be grounded in, but alas! are not so.

William James (1842 - 1910)

Source: The Thought and Character of William James, by Ralph Barton Perry

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on cheerfulness, earth, health, mind, morality, people, and work

Cheerfulness removes the rust from the mind, lubricates our inward machinery, and enables us to do our work with fewer creaks and groans. If people were universally cheerful, there wouldn't be half the quarreling or a tenth part of the wickedness there is. Cheerfulness, too, promotes health and morality. Cheerful people live longest here on earth, afterward in our hearts.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on business, character, conscience, destruction, humanity, knowledge, morality, pleasure, politics, principles, sacrifice, science, wealth, work, and worship

The Seven Deadly Sins that will destroy us are: Knowledge without character. Business without morality. Science without humanity. Worship without sacrifice. Pleasure without conscience. Politics without principle. Wealth without work.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on admiration, conscience, morality, perfection, purity, and remorse

You still don't know what you're dealing with do you? Perfect organism. Its structural perfection is matched only by its hostility. . . I admire its purity, a survivor, unclouded by conscience, remorse or delusions of morality

unknown

Source: Aliens

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Tryon Edwards on god, morality, religion, spirit, and world

Piety and morality are but the same spirit differently manifested. Piety is religion with its face toward God; morality is religion with its face toward the world.

Tryon Edwards (1809 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on america, benevolence, certainty, character, christianity, country, effort, fatherhood, innocence, inventions, jesus, morality, religion, support, and traditions

The efforts of certain Christian factions to cast themselves as the inheritors of America's Judaeo-Christian tradition find little support in the embarrassing heterodoxy of this Founding Father: "But the greatest of all reformers of the depraved religion of his own country was Jesus of Nazareth. Abstracting what is really his from the rubbish in which it is buried, easily distinguished by its lustre from the dross of his biographers, and as separable as the diamond from the dunghill, we have the outlines of a system of the most sublime morality which has ever fallen from the lips of man; outlines which it is lamentable he did not live to fill up. . . . The establishment of the innocent and genuine character of this benevolent moralist, and the rescuing it from the imputation of imposture, which has resulted from artificial systems, invented by ultra-Christian sects, unauthorized by a single word ever uttered by him, is a most desirable object. . . ."

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Source: Letter to William Short, October 31 (Halloween), 1819

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas G. West on force, morality, nations, observation, principles, privacy, understanding, and virtue

The founders of this nation understood that private morality is the fount from whence sound public policy springs. Replying to Washington's first inaugural address, the Senate stated: "We feel, sir, the force and acknowledge the justness of the observation that the foundation of our national policy should be lain in private morality. If individuals be not influenced by moral principles it is in vain to look for public virtue."

Thomas G. West

Source: The Federalist Papers & American Founding, ed. Charles R. Kesler, NY, The Free Press, 1987.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Theodore Roosevelt on america, civilization, community, conflict, conquest, day, debt, humanity, idleness, impatience, interest, judgment, mankind, morality, nations, needs, rudeness, rules, sentimentality, stability, success, war, and world

Theodore Roosevelt, impatient with the excesses of "purely sentimental historians," authored his own stirring vindication of America's relations with the Indians: Looked at from the standpoint of the ultimate result, there was little real difference to the Indian whether the land was taken by treaty or by war. . . . No treaty could be satisfactory to the whites, no treaty served the needs of humanity and civilization, unless it gave the land to the Americans as unreservedly as any successful war. Whether the whites won the land by treaty, by armed conflict, or, as was actually the case, by a mixture of both, mattered comparatively little so long as the land was won. It was all-important that it should be won, for the benefit of civilization and in the interests of mankind. It is, indeed, a warped, perverse, and silly morality which would forbid a course of conquest that has turned whole continents into the seats of mighty and flourishing civilized nations. . . . It is as idle to apply to savages the rules of international morality which obtain between stable and cultured communities, as it would be to judge the fifth-century English conquest of Britain by the standards of to-day. The most ultimately righteous of all wars is a war with savages, though it is apt to be also the most terrible and inhuman. The rude, fierce settler who drives the savage from the land lays all civilized mankind under a debt to him. . . . It is of incalculable importance that America, Australia, and Siberia should pass out of the hands of their red, black, and yellow aboriginal owners, and become the heritage of the dominant world races.

Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919)

Source: The Winning of the West: Book IV, 1896

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Steve Perry on assumptions, conformity, life, logic, morality, nature, and suffering

"Humans suffer from self-centred notions as to the nature of life. Humans assume that alien life forms should conform to standards that match our own, including logic and morality. Even among humans, morality is ignored when expedient. Why should we expect more from an alien life form than we demand from ourselves?"

Steve Perry

Contributed by: Zaady

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