merit

A Quote by François, Duc de La Rochefoucauld on ability, art, good, merit, and reputation

The art of being able to make a good use of moderate abilities wins esteem, and often confers more reputation than greater real merit.

Duc de La Rochefoucauld (1613 - 1680)

Source: Réflexions ou Sentences et Maximes Morales

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by David Eugene Smith on god, mathematics, merit, poetry, religion, science, spirit, thought, truth, words, and world

One merit of mathematics few will deny: it says more in fewer words than any other science. The formula, e^iπ = -1 expressed a world of thought, of truth, of poetry, and of the religious spirit "God eternally geometrizes."

David Eugene Smith

Source: N. Rose Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh NC:Rome Press Inc., 1988.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dante Alighieri on angels, day, fatherhood, forgiveness, god, grace, heaven, humility, learning, love, men, merit, peace, power, praise, prayer, pride, proof, and strength

They find seven cornices on which penitent and redeemed sinners are cleansed by the grace of God. On the first cornice, that of Pride, the proud are learning humility: Our Father, dwelling in the Heavens, nowise As circumscribed, but as the things above, Thy first effects, are dearer in Thine eyes, Hallowed Thy name be and the Power thereof, By every creature, as right meet it is We praise the tender effluence of Thy love. Let come to us, let come Thy kingdom's peace; If it come not, we've no power of our own To come to it, for all our subtleties. Like as with glad Hosannas at Thy throne Thine angels offer up their wills alway, So let men offer theirs, that Thine be done. Our daily manna give to us this day, Without which he that through this desert wild Toils most to speed goes backward on his way. As we, with all our debtors reconciled, Forgive, do thou forgive us, nor regard Our merits, but upon our sins look mild. Put not our strength, too easily ensnared And overcome, to proof with the old foe; But save us from him, for he tries it hard. This last prayer is not made for us-we know Dear Lord, that it is needless-but for those Who still remain behind us we pray so.

Dante Alighieri (1265 - 1321)

Source: Inferno

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dan Barker on acceptance, faith, and merit

Faith is a cop-out. It is intellectual bankruptcy. If the only way you can accept an assertion is by faith, then you are conceding that it can't be taken on its own merits.

Dan Barker

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel on merit and nature

Nature gives you the face you have at twenty; it is up to you to merit the face you have at fifty.

Coco Chanel (1883 - 1970)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charlotte Brontë on majorities, merit, and nature

If you are cast in a different mould to the majority, it is no merit of yours: Nature did it.

Charlotte Bronte (1816 - 1855)

Source: Mr. Rochester in Jane Eyre, ch. 14, 1847.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Catharine A. MacKinnon on individuality, life, merit, and reputation

An individual's treatment and alternatives in life may depend as much on the reputation of the group to which that person belongs as on their own merit.

Catharine A. MacKinnon

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Siddhartha Gautama Buddha on fear, merit, obstacles, sorrow, and tears

When a man venerates those worthy of veneration, be they Buddhas or their disciples, who have transcended all obstacles and passed beyond sorrow and tears - venerating such as these, whose passions are extinguished and for whom there is no further source for fear, no one can calculate how great his merit is.

Buddha (563 - 483 BC)

Source: Sayings of the Buddha in The Dhammapada, p. 195, 196

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bodhidharma on affliction, blessings, body, buddhism, desires, merit, mind, nature, people, practice, water, and work

Disciple: But the Bathhouse Sutra says, "By contributing to the bathing of monks, people receive limitless blessings." This would appear to be an instance of external practice achieving merit. How does this relate to beholding the mind? Bodhidharma: . . . Our true buddha-nature has no shape. And the dust of affliction has no form. How can people use ordinary water to wash an intangible body? It won't work. . . . To clean such a body you have to behold it. Once impurities and filth arise from desire, they multiply until they cover you inside and out. But if you try to wash this body of yours, you'll have to scrub until it's nearly gone before it's clean.

Bodhidharma (c. 440 AD - 528 AD)

Source: The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma, p. 109

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on dignity, duty, lies, merit, and thinking

Man is obviously made for thinking. Therein lies all his dignity and his merit; and his whole duty is to think as he ought.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: Pensées. 1670.

Contributed by: Zaady

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