men

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on blessings, camping, citizenship, courage, day, desires, freedom, generations, god, harmony, health, humanity, humility, inspiration, labor, life, men, nations, observation, peace, population, posterity, praise, resolution, r

It has pleased Almighty God to prolong our national life another year, . . . to favor as well our citizens in their homes as our soldiers in their camps, and our sailors on the rivers and seas, with unusual health. He has largely augmented our free population by emancipation and by immigration, while he has opened to us new sources of wealth, and has corned* the labor of our working-men in every department of industry with abundant rewards. Moreover, he has been pleased to animate and inspire our minds and hearts with fortitude, courage, and resolution sufficient for the great trial . . . into which we have been brought by our adherence as a nation to the cause of freedom and humanity. . . . Now, therefore, I . . . do hereby appoint and set apart the last Thursday in November next as a day which I desire to be observed by all my fellow-citizens, wherever they may be then, as a day of thanksgiving and praise to Almighty God, the beneficent Creator and Ruler of the Universe. And I do further recommend to my fellow-citizens aforesaid, that on that occasion they do reverently humble themselves in the dust, and from thence offer up penitent and fervent prayers and supplications to the great Disposer of events for a return of the inestimable blessings of peace, union, and harmony throughout the land which it has pleased him to assign as a dwelling-place for ourselves and for our posterity throughout all generations. *preserved

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Proclamation of Thanksgiving, Address, October 3, 1863

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on america, congress, constitution, fatherhood, liberty, men, people, and safety

Our safety, our liberty, depends upon preserving the Constitution of the United States as our fathers made it inviolate. The people of the United States are the rightful masters of both Congress and the courts - not to overthrow the Constitution, but to overthrow the men who pervert the Constitution.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on adversity, affliction, good, men, philosophy, poets, pride, prosperity, and words

It is said an Eastern monarch once charged his wise men to invent him a sentence, to be ever in view, and which should be true and appropriate in all times and situations. They presented him the words: 'And this, too, shall pass away.' How much it expresses! How chastening in the hour of pride! - how consoling in the depth of affliction! Many versions of this story exist. Another one is: "The Sultan asked for a Signet motto, that should hold good for Adversity or Prosperity. Solomon gave him, 'This also shall pass away.'" - Edward Fitzgerald, Polonius: A Collection of Wise Saws and Modern Instances, item 112, p. 80 (1901). The words In neez bogzarad, which can be translated, "This also shall pass," appear in the Diven of the twelfth century Persian poet and philosopher, Sana'I of Ghaznl, ed. Mazahir Musaffa, p. 92 (1957).

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: address before the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, September 30, 1859.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on labor, liberty, men, names, and tyranny

Address at Sanitary Fair, Baltimore, Maryland, April 18, 1864 We all declare for liberty; but in using the same word we do not all mean the same thing. With some the word liberty may mean for each man to do as he pleases with himself, and the product of his labor; while with others, the same word many mean for some men to do as they please with other men, and the product of other men's labor. Here are two, not only different, but incompatible things, called by the same name - liberty. And it follows that each of the things is, by the respective parties, called by two different and incompatible names - liberty and tyranny.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln edited by Roy P. Basler, VolumeVII, April 18, 1864, p 301.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on army, defense, destruction, discipline, god, independence, liberty, love, men, spirit, strength, struggle, tyranny, and war

What constitutes the bulwark of our own liberty and independence? It is not our frowning battlements, our bristling sea coasts, the guns of our war steamers, or the strength of our gallant and disciplined army. These are not our reliance against a resumption of tyranny in our fair land. All of them may be turned against our liberties, without making us stronger or weaker for the struggle. Our reliance is in the love of liberty which God has planted in our bosoms. Our defense is in the preservation of the spirit which prizes liberty as the heritage of all men, in all lands, every where. Destroy this spirit, and you have planted the seeds of despotism around your own doors. The last two sentences appear in slightly varying form inscribed on a plaque in the stairwell of the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty: "Our defense is in the spirit which prized liberty as the heritage of all men, in all lands everywhere. Destroy this spirit and you have planted the seeds of despotism at your own doors."

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Abraham Lincoln, speech at Edwardsville, Illinois, September 11, 1858

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on doubt, hope, liberty, and men

I leave you, hoping that the lamp of liberty will burn in your bosoms until there shall no longer be a doubt that all men are created free and equal. .

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Speech at Chicago, Illinois, July 10, 1858

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on action, charity, community, government, individuality, justice, men, nature, needs, people, schools, separation, and variety

The legitimate object of government is to do for a community of people whatever they need to have done, but cannot do at all in their separate and individual capacities. In all that the people can individually do as well for themselves, government ought not to interfere. The desirable things which the individuals of a people can not do, or can not well do, for themselves, fall into two classes: those which have relation to wrongs, and those which have not. Each of these branch off into an infinite variety of subdivisions. The first - that in relation to wrongs - embraces all crimes, misdemeanors, and nonperformance of contracts. The other embraces all which, in its nature, and without wrong, requires combined action, as public roads and highways, public schools, charities, pauperism, orphanage, estates of the deceased, and the machinery of government itself. From this it appears that if all men were just, there still would be some, though not so much, need for government.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: fragment on government (July 1, 1854?)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on beginning, god, hope, ideas, inspiration, labor, men, mind, principles, and work

It is better then, to save the work while it is begun. You have done the labor; maintain it - keep it. If men choose to serve you, go with them; but as you have made up your organization upon principle, stand by it; for as surely as God reigns over you, and has inspired your mind, and given you a sense of propriety, and continues to give you hope, so surely will you still cling to these ideas, and you will at last come back after your wanderings, merely to do your work over again.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: speech at Chicago, Illinois, July 10, 1858.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on agreement, citizenship, government, happiness, men, reason, and present

I agree with you, Mr. Chairman, that the working men are the basis of all governments, for the plain reason that they are the more numerous, and as you added that those were the sentiments of the gentlemen present, representing not only the working class, but citizens of other callings than those of the mechanic, I am happy to concur with you in these sentiments, not only of the native born citizens, but also of the Germans and foreigners from other countries.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: speech to Germans at Cincinnati, Ohio, February 12, 1861

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on men

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You cannot help men permanently by doing for them what they could and should do for themselves.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Speech at Clinton, 8 Sept. 1858

Contributed by: Zaady

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