men

A Quote by William Shakespeare on adoption, ideas, men, satisfaction, and thought

Some men never seem to grow old. Always active in thought, always ready to adopt new ideas, they are never chargeable with foggyism. Satisfied, yet ever dissatisfied, settled, yet ever unsettled, they always enjoy the best of what is, are the first to find the best of what will be.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on age, good, history, honor, jealousy, justice, men, men and women, reputation, schools, soldiers, time, women, and world

All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players: They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages. At first the infant, Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms. And then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel, And shining morning face, creeping like snail Unwillingly to school. And then the lover, Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier, Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard, Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel, Seeking the bubble reputation Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice, In fair round belly with good capon lin'd, With eyes severe, and beard of formal cut, Full of wise saws and modern instances; And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon, With spectacles on nose and pouch on side, His youthful hose, well saved a world too wide For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice, Turning again towards childish treble, pipes An whistles in his sound. Last scene of all, That ends this strange eventful history, Is second childishness, and mere oblivion, Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, Act 2, scene 7.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on enemies, god, joy, and men

O God! that men should put an enemy in their mouths to steal away their brains; that we should, with joy, pleasance, revel, and applause, transform ourselves into beasts.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Othello

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on evil, manners, men, and water

Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues We write in water.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Henry VIII, Act 4, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on church, divinity, good, men, and teaching

If to do were as easy as to know what were good to do, chapels had been churches, and poor men's cottages princes palaces. It is a good divine that follows his own instructions: I can easier teach twenty what were good to be done, than be one of the twenty to follow mine own teaching.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Merchant of Venice

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on contentment, envy, good, happiness, and men

I am a true laborer: I earn that I eat, get that I wear, owe no man hate, envy no man's happiness, glad of other men's good, content with my harm.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, Act III, Scene ii

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on deception, heresy, and men

For as a surfeit of the sweetest things The deepest loathing to the stomach brings, Or as tie heresies that men do leave Are hated most of those they did deceive, So thou, my surfeit and my heresy, Of all be hated, but the most of me!

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM, Act 2, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on men and words

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Men of few words are the best men.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Henry V

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on men

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Small things make base men proud.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Henry VI, Part II, Act IV

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on contentment, envy, good, happiness, men, and pride

Sir, I am a true laborer: I earn that I eat, get that I wear,owe no man hate, envy no man's happiness, glad of other men's good, content with my harm, and the greatest of my pride is to see my ewes graze and my lambs suck.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: AS YOU LIKE IT, Act 3, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

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