men

A Quote by William Somerset Maugham on hatred and men

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She [Sadie Thompson] gathered herself together. No one could describe the scorn of her expression or the contemptuous hatred she put into her answer. "You men! You filthy dirty pigs! You're all the same, all of you. Pigs! Pigs!"

William Somerset Maugham (1874 - 1965)

Source: Altogether, 1934. Rain

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Somerset Maugham on day, good, men, and soul

I forget who it was that recommended men for their soul's good to do each day two things they disliked. . . . It is a precept I have followed scrupulously: for every day I have got up and I have gone to bed.

William Somerset Maugham (1874 - 1965)

Source: The Moon and Sixpence, 1919, ch. 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on defense, earth, envy, happiness, men, nature, paradise, war, and world

This royal throne of kings, this sceptered isle, This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars, This other eden, demi-paradise, This fortress built by nature for herself Against infection and the hand of war, This happy breed of men, this little world, This prescious stone set in the silver sea, Which serves it in the office of a wall Or as a moat defensive to a house, Against the envy of less happier lands, This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England . . .

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Richard II, Act 2, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on danger and men

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He thinks too much. Such men are dangerous.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Act 1, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on fear and men

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When daisies pied and violets blue And lady-smocks all silver-white And cuckoo-buds of yellow hue Do paint the meadows with delight, The cuckoo then, on every tree, Mocks married men; for thus sings he, Cuckoo; Cuckoo, cuckoo; O, word of fear, Unpleasing to a married ear.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Love’s Labour’s Lost, Act 5, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on faults, lies, and men

Roses have thorns, and silver fountains mud; Clouds and eclipses stain both moon and sun, And loathsome canker lies in sweetest bud. All men make faults.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Sonnet 35

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day, judgment, and men

Men judge by the complexion of the sky The state and inclination of the day:

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Richard II, Act 3, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on men

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Men should be what they seem.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Othello

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on ambition, belief, country, death, fortune, friendship, honor, joy, judgment, life, love, lovers, men, patience, respect, rudeness, senses, silence, slavery, tears, and wisdom

BRUTUS: Be patient till the last. Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause, and be silent, that you may hear: believe me for mine honour, and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe: censure me in your wisdom, and awake your senses, that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: - Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more. Had you rather Caesar were living and die all slaves, than that Caesar were dead, to live all free men? As Caesar loved me, I weep for him; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him: but, as he was ambitious, I slew him. There is tears for his love; joy for his fortune; honour for his valour; and death for his ambition. Who is here so base that would be a bondman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so vile that will not love his country? If any, speak; for him have I offended. I pause for a reply.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on friendship, love, men, observation, and war

Brutus, I do observe you now of late: I have not from your eyes that gentleness And show of love as I was wont to have: You bear too stubborn and too strange a hand Over your friend that loves you. Poor Brutus, with himself at war, Forgets the shows of love to other men.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cesar, Act 1, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

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