memory

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on action, conscience, failure, fate, guidance, history, honor, hope, life, memory, passion, past, play, sincerity, trying, and worth

History with its flickering lamp stumbles along the trail of the past, trying to reconstruct its scenes, to revive its echoes, and kindle with pale gleams the passion of former days. What is the worth of all this? The only guide to a man is his conscience; the only shield to his memory is the rectitude and sincerity of his actions. It is very imprudent to walk through life without this shield, because we are so often mocked by the failure of our hopes and the upsetting of our calculations; but with this shield, however the fate may play, we march always in the ranks of honor.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: Tribute to Neville Chamberlain, House of Commons, November 1940

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on bitterness, conflict, earth, heart, heaven, memory, and mercy

Sweet Mercy! to the gates of heaven This minstrel lead, his sins forgiven; The rueful conflict, the heart riven With vain endeavour, And memory of Earth's bitter leaven Effaced forever.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Thoughts suggested on the Banks of the Nith.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on death, destruction, memory, silence, and soul

And when the stream Which overflowed the soul was passed away, A consciousness remained that it had left Deposited upon the silent shore Of memory images and precious thoughts That shall not die, and cannot be destroyed.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Excursion. Book vii.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on memory

in

Meek Walton's heavenly memory.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Part iii. v. Walton's Book of Lives.

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A Quote by William Shakespeare on books and memory

I'll note you in my book of memory.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Henry VI, Part I, Act II

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on adoption, blessings, borrowing, character, day, entertainment, familiarity, farewells, friendship, generosity, habits, judgment, memory, seasons, soul, thought, and vulgarity

And these few precepts in thy memory Look thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue, Nor any unproportion'd thought his act. Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar; The friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel; But do not dull thy palm with entertainment Of each new-hatch'd, unfledg'd comrade. Beware Of entrance to a quarrel; but, being in, Bear't that th' opposed may beware of thee. Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice; Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy; For the apparel oft proclaims the man, And they in France of the best rank and station Are most select and generous, chief in that. Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry, This above all: to thine own self be true, And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man. Farewell; my blessing season this in thee!

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet (Folger Shakespeare Library), Pages: Act I Scene iii

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A Quote by Willa Sibert Cather on memory

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Some memories are realities, and are better than anything that can ever happen to one again.

Willa Cather (1873 - 1947)

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A Quote by Wendell Berry on deals, decisions, justice, memory, nature, and politicians

Whether we and our politicians know it or not, Nature is party to all our deals and decisions, and she has more votes, a longer memory, and a sterner sense of justice than we do.

Wendell Berry (1934 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Viktor E. Frankl on brothers, camping, children, commitment, destruction, existence, family, fatherhood, hunger, life, losing, love, meaning, memory, motherhood, possessions, sister, suffering, suicide, talent, time, value, wives, and worth

Allport, Gordon W., in his preface to Man's Search for Meaning: "WHY DO YOU NOT COMMIT SUICIDE?" Dr. Frankl asks his patients. . . . in one life there is love for one's children to tie to; in another life, a talent to be used; in a third, perhaps only lingering memories worth preserving. . . . As a long-time prisoner in bestial concentration camps he [Viktor Frankl] found himself stripped to naked existence. His father, mother, brother, and his wife died in camps or were sent to gas ovens, so that, excepting for his sister, his entire family perished in these camps. How could he - every possession lost, every value destroyed, suffering from hunger, cold and brutality, hourly expecting extermination - how could he find life worth preserving?

Viktor Frankl (1905 - 1997)

Source: Preface by Gordon W. Allport to Man’s Search for Meaning, Simon and Schuster, NY, 1963, p. 127.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by V. S. Pritchett on family, legends, lies, memory, people, privacy, violence, and writers

All writers - all people - have their stores of private and family legends which lie like a collection of half-forgotten, often violent toys on the floor of memory.

V. S. Pritchett (1900 - 1997)

Source: "New Yorker," 19 Feb 1979.

Contributed by: Zaady

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