medicine

A Quote by Hippocrates on ethics, medicine, and harm

Primum non nocere. (First, do no harm.)

Hippocrates (c.460 - 400 BC)

Contributed by: Barry

A Quote by Hippocrates on doctor, medicine, and self care

If you are not your own doctor, you are a fool.

Hippocrates (c.460 - 400 BC)

Contributed by: Areté

A Quote by Mevlana Jelalu'ddin Rumi on medicine and principles

Fasting is the first principle of medicine.

Mevlana Rumi (1207 - 1273)

Source: Rumi Daylight: A Daybook of Spiritual Guidance

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on death, doctors, life, and medicine

By medicine life may be prolonged, yet death will seize the doctor too.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Cymbeline, Act 5, scene 5.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Osler on art, medicine, science, and uncertainty

Medicine is a science of uncertainty and an art of probability.

William Osler (1849 - 1919)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by François Marie Arouet Voltaire on disease, doctors, and medicine

Doctors prescribe medicine of which they know little, to cure diseases of which they know less, in human beings of which they know nothing.

Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by François Marie Arouet Voltaire on art, disease, medicine, nature, and patience

The art of medicine consists of amusing the patient while nature cures the disease.

Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on medicine and needs

Gardening is medicine that does not need a prescription . . . And with no limit on dosage.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Titus Livy on history, medicine, mind, and study

The study of History is the best medicine for a sick mind.

Titus Livy (59 BC - 17 AD)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sydney Smith on death, horses, medicine, privilege, and youth

The schoolboy whips his taxed top; the beardless youth manages his taxed horse with a taxed bridle on a taxed road; and the dying Englishman, pouring his medicine, which has paid seven per cent, into a spoon that has paid fifteen per cent, flings himself back upon his chintz bed which has paid twenty-two per cent, and expires in the arms of an apothecary who has paid a license of a hundred pounds for the privilege of putting him to death.

Sydney Smith (1771 - 1845)

Source: Review of Seybert's Annals of the United States, 1820.

Contributed by: Zaady

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