mathematics

A Quote by Sylvia Townsend Warner on anecdotes, fortune, leadership, mathematics, and theology

Theology, Mr. Fortune found, is a more accommodating subject than mathematics; its technique of exposition allows greater latitude. For instance when you are gravelled for matter there is always the moral to fall back upon. Comparisons too may be drawn, leading cases cited, types and antetypes analysed and anecdotes introduced. Except for Archimedes mathematics is singularly naked of anecdotes.

Sylvia Townsend Warner (1893 - 1978)

Source: Mr. Fortune's Maggot.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stanislaw Ulam on chess, drugs, happiness, kindness, mathematics, practice, reality, reason, unhappiness, and world

In many cases, mathematics is an escape from reality. The mathematician finds his own monastic niche and happiness in pursuits that are disconnected from external affairs. Some practice it as if using a drug. Chess sometimes plays a similar role. In their unhappiness over the events of this world, some immerse themselves in a kind of self-sufficiency in mathematics. (Some have engaged in it for this reason alone.)

Stanislaw Ulam

Source: Adventures of a Mathematician, Scribner's, New York, 1976.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Isaac Newton on authors, laws, mathematics, and nature

The latest authors, like the most ancient, strove to subordinate the phenomena of nature to the laws of mathematics.

Sir Isaac Newton (1642 - 1727)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Siméon Poisson on good, life, mathematics, and teaching

Life is good for only two things, discovering mathematics and teaching mathematics.

Simeon Poisson (1781 - 1840)

Source: Mathematics Magazine, v. 64, no. 1, Feb. 1991.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Rudolph Carnap on certainty, change, conflict, experience, kindness, language, logic, mathematics, physics, radicals, revolution, rules, science, truth, and value

I should make a distinction between two kinds of readjustment in the case of a conflict with experience, namely, between a change in the language, and a mere change in or addition of, a truth-value ascribed to an indeterminate statement (i.e. a statement whose truth value is not fixed by the rules of language, say by the postulates of logic, mathematics and physics). A change of the first kind constitutes a radical alteration, sometimes a revolution, and it occurs only at certain historically decisive points in the development of science. On the other hand, changes of the second kind occur every minute. A change of the first kind constitutes, strictly speaking, a transition from a language Ln into a new language Ln+1.

Rudolph Carnap

Source: "Replies and Systematic Expositions," Schlipp, The Philosophy of Rudolf Carnap [Carnap63], p921

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Roger Bacon on body, excellence, mathematics, men, purity, remedies, respect, tennis, understanding, and wit

In the mathematics I can report no deficience, except that it be that men do not sufficiently understand the excellent use of the pure mathematics, in that they do remedy and cure many defects in the wit and faculties intellectual. For if the wit be too dull, they sharpen it; if too wandering, they fix it; if too inherent in the sense, they abstract it. So that as tennis is a game of no use in itself, but of great use in respect it maketh a quick eye and a body ready to put itself into all postures; so in the mathematics, that use which is collateral and intervenient is no less worthy than that which is principal and intended.

Roger Bacon (c. 1214 - c. 1294)

Source: John Fauvel and Jeremy Gray (eds.) A History of Mathematics: A Reader, Sheridan House, 1987.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Roger Bacon on knowledge, mathematics, and world

For the things of this world cannot be made known without a knowledge of mathematics.

Roger Bacon (c. 1214 - c. 1294)

Source: Opus Majus part 4 Distinctia Prima cap 1, 1267.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Anson Heinlein on learning and mathematics

Anyone who cannot cope with mathematics is not fully human. At best he is a tolerable subhuman who has learned to wear shoes, bathe, and not make messes in the house.

Robert Heinlein (1907 - 1988)

Source: Time Enough for Love.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard W. Hamming on information, mathematics, and sports

Mathematics is an interesting intellectual sport but it should not be allowed to stand in the way of obtaining sensible information about physical processes.

Richard W. Hamming

Source: N. Rose Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh NC: Rome Press Inc., 1988.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by René Descartes on mathematics

With me everything turns into mathematics. omnia apud me mathematica fiunt

René Descartes (1596 - 1650)

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content