Math

A Quote by Douglas Adams on math and universe

It is known that are an infinite number of worlds, simply because there are an infinite amount of space for them to be in. However not every one of them is inhabited. Any finite number divided by infinity is as near nothing as makes no odds, so the average population of all the planets in the universe can be said to be zero. From this it follows that the population of the whole universe is also zero, and that any people you may meet from time to time are merely products of a deranged imagination.

Douglas Adams

Contributed by: Library Drone

A Quote by Giuseppe Peano on cosmos, universe, infinity, numbers, and math

No number before zero. The numbers may go on forever, but like the cosmos,~ they have a beginning.

Giuseppe Peano

Source: The Advent of the Algorithm: The 300-Year Journey from an Idea to the Computer, Pages: 33

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by David Berlinski on math and mathematics

For the most part, it is true, ordinary men and women regard mathematics with energetic distaste, counting its concepts as rhapsodic as cauliflower. This is a mistake--there is no other word. Where else can the restless human mind find means to tie the infinite in a finite bow?

David Berlinski

Source: The Advent of the Algorithm: The 300-Year Journey from an Idea to the Computer, Pages: 24

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by David Berlinski on logic, system, geometry, euclid, math, and structure

The world of shapes, lines, curves, and solids is as varied as the world of numbers, and it is only our long-satisfied possession of Euclidean geometry that offers us the impression, or the illusion, that it has, that world, already been encompassed in a manageable intellectual structure. The lineaments of that structure are well known: as in the rest of life, something is given and something is gotten; but the logic behind those lineaments is apt to pass unnoticed, and it is the logic that controls the system.

David Berlinski

Source: The Advent of the Algorithm: The 300-Year Journey from an Idea to the Computer, Pages: 31

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by David Berlinski on math, science, and hypothesis

At the beginning of the new millennium, we still do not know why mathematics is true and whether it is certain. But we know what we do not know in an immeasurably richer way than we did. And learning this has been a remarkable achievement--among the greatest and least-known of the modern era.

David Berlinski

Source: The Advent of the Algorithm: The 300-Year Journey from an Idea to the Computer, Pages: xviii

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by David Berlinski on math and algorithm

The world the algorithm makes possible is retrograde in its nature to the world of mathematical physics. Its fundamental theoretical objects are symbols, and not muons, gluons, quarks, or space and time fused into a pliant knot. Algorithms are human artifacts. They belong to the world of memory and meaning, desire and design.

David Berlinski

Source: The Advent of the Algorithm: The 300-Year Journey from an Idea to the Computer, Pages: xvii

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by David Berlinski on math, algorithm, calculation, definition, thought, matter, and computer

More than sixty years ago, mathematical logicians, by defining precisely the concept of an algorithm, gave content to the ancient human idea of an effective calculation. Their definitions led to the creation of the digital computer, an interesting example of thought bending matter to its ends.

David Berlinski

Source: The Advent of the Algorithm: The 300-Year Journey from an Idea to the Computer, Pages: xi

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Charles Robert Darwin on math, mathematics, and mathematician

A mathematician is a blind man in a dark room looking for a black cat that isn't there.

Charles Darwin (1809 - 1882)

Contributed by: Rebecca

A Quote by Galileo Galilei on circle, familiarity, impossibility, language, logic, math, universe, and words

[The universe] cannot be read until we have learnt the language and become familiar with the characters in which it is written.  It is written in mathematical language, and the letters are triangles, circles and other geometrical figures, without which means it is humanly impossible to comprehend a single word.

Galileo Galilei (1564 - 1642)

Source: Opere Il Saggiatore p. 171

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content