machines

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on machines, secrets, work, and world

Man is a shrewd inventor, and is ever taking the hint of a new machine from his own structure, adapting some secret of his own anatomy in iron, wood, and leather, to some required function in the work of the world.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on machines, nature, simplicity, and universe

The simplicity of the universe is very different from the simplicity of a machine. The simplicity of nature is not that which may be easily read but is inexhaustible. The last analysis can no wise be made.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Phillips Brooks on christianity, faith, god, ideas, life, machines, men, pain, power, suffering, present, and thought

No man dares to condemn the Christian faith today, because the Christian faith has not been tried. Not until men get rid of the thought that it is a poor machine, an expedient for saving them from suffering and pain; not until they get the grand idea of it as the great power of God present in and through the lives of men; not until then does Christianity enter upon its true trial and become ready to show what it can do.

Phillips Brooks (1835 - 1893)

Source: The Law of Growth

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Paul Erdös on machines

A Mathematician is a machine for turning coffee into theorems.

Paul Erdos

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A Quote by Nicholas Copernicus on astronomy, beginning, certainty, confusion, discovery, earth, facts, learning, machines, opportunity, reason, reflection, schools, teachers, time, traditions, understanding, universe, vision, and world

The Copernican vision of an earth in motion was not without its rudimentary precedents, as Copernicus himself recounts: "For a long time then, I reflected on this confusion in the astronomical traditions concerning the derivation of the motions of the universe's spheres. I began to be annoyed that the movements of the world machine, created for our sake by the best and most systematic Artisan of all, were not understood with greater certainty by the philosophers, who otherwise examined so precisely the most insignificant trifles of this world. For this reason I undertook the task of rereading the works of all the philosophers which I could obtain to learn whether anyone had ever proposed other motions of the universe's spheres than those expounded by the teachers of astronomy in the schools. And in fact I found in Cicero that Hicetas supposed the earth to move. Later I also discovered in Plutarch that certain others were of this opinion. . . . Therefore, having obtained the opportunity from these sources, I too began to consider the mobility of the earth."

Nicholas Copernicus (1473 - 1543)

Source: Letter to Pope Paul III: Preface to De Revolutionibus, 1543

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A Quote by Nathanael West on language and machines

Prayers for the condemned man will be offered on an adding machine. Numbers constitute the only universal language.

Nathanael West (1903 - 1940)

Source: Miss Lonelyhearts.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Matt Groening on dance, love, and machines

Love is a perky elf dancing a merry little jig and then suddenly he turns on you with a miniature machine gun.

Matt Groening

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A Quote by Louis L'Amour on books, country, death, losing, machines, restaurants, simplicity, time, and worry

Books are the perfect Time Machine. By the simple act of opening a book you can, in an instant, be travelling up a jungle river without once being bitten by mosquitoes, or you can almost die of thirst in the desert while holding a cold drink in your hand, or dine in the finest restaurants and never have to worry about paying the bill, or ride the wild country of our western frontier and never worry about losing your scalp to a raiding party.

Louis L'Amour (1908 - 1988)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lesslie Newbigin on acquaintance, agreement, christ, christianity, church, cities, civilization, community, control, culture, earth, family, force, god, home, individuality, jesus, jobs, loneliness, machines, men, nations, nature, neighbors, p

Western European civilization has witnessed a sort of atomizing process, in which the individual is more and more set free from his natural setting in family and neighborhood, and becomes a sort of replaceable unit in the social machine. His nearest neighbors may not even know his name. He is free to move from place to place, from job to job, from acquaintance to acquaintance, and - if he has attained a high degree of emancipation - from wife to wife. He is in every context a more and more anonymous and replaceable part, the perfect incarnation of the rationalist conception of man. Wherever western civilization has spread in the past one hundred years, it has carried this atomizing process with it. Its characteristic product in Calcutta, Shanghai, or Johannesburg, is the modern city into which myriads of human beings, loosened from their old ties in village or tribe or caste, like grains of sand fretted by water from an ancient block of sandstone, are ceaselessly churned around in the whirlpool of the city - anonymous, identical, replaceable units. In such a situation, it is natural that men should long for some sort of real community, for men cannot be human without it. It is especially natural that Christians should reach out after that part of Christian doctrine which speaks of the true, God-given community, the Church of Jesus Christ. We have witnessed the appalling results of trying to go back to some sort of primitive collectivity based on the total control of the individual, down t o the depths of his spirit, by an all-powerful group. Yet we know that we cannot condemn this solution to the problem of man's loneliness if we have no other to offer. It is natural that men should ask with a greater eagerness than ever before, such questions as these: "Is there in truth a family of God on earth to which I can belong, a place where all men can be truly at home? If so, where is it to be found, what are its marks, and how is it related to, and distinguished from, the known communities of family, nation, and culture? What are its boundaries, its structure, its terms of membership? And how comes it that those who claim to be the spokesmen of that one holy fellowship are themselves at war with one another as to the fundamentals of its nature, and unable to agree to live together in unity and concord?" The breakdown of Christendom has forced such questions as these to the front. I think that there is no more urgent theological task than to try to give them plain and credible answers.

Lesslie Newbigin

Source: The Household of God

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Le Corbusier on life and machines

A house is a machine for living in.

Le Corbusier (1887 - 1965)

Source: Vers une Architecture, 1923

Contributed by: Zaady

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