machines

A Quote by Van Jones on green, environment, economy, machines, and work

A green economy begins to replace some of the clunking and chugging of ugly machines with the wise effort of beautiful, skilled people. That means more jobs.

Van Jones

Source: The Green Collar Economy: How One Solution Can Fix Our Two Biggest Problems

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Ernst Fischer on machines, greatness, and imperfection

As machines become more and more efficient and perfect, so it will become clear that imperfection is the greatness of man.

Ernst Fischer

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by May Sarton on instant success, machines, corruption, natural rhythm, hurried, and value

Instant success is the order of the day; "I want it now!"  I wonder whether this is not part of our corruption by machines.  Machines do things very quickly and outside the natural rhythm of life...so the few things that we still do...anything at all that cannot be hurried, have a very particular value.

May Sarton

Source: Journal of a Solitude

Contributed by: Kimpossible

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on argument, certainty, conviction, day, discovery, doubt, education, existence, facts, friendship, hell, independence, machines, mathematics, military, persistence, play, purity, purpose, reality, reason,

Some of my cousins who had the great advantage of University education used to tease me with arguments to prove that nothing has any existence except what we think of it. . . . These amusing mental acrobatics are all right to play with. They are perfectly harmless and perfectly useless. . . . I always rested on the following argument. . . We look up to the sky and see the sun. Our eyes are dazzled and our senses record the fact. So here is this great sun standing apparently on no better foundation than our physical senses. But happily there is a method, apart altogether from our physical senses, of testing the reality of the sun. It is by mathematics. By means of prolonged processes of mathematics, entirely separate from the senses, astronomers are able to calculate when an eclipse will occur. They predict by pure reason that a black spot will pass across the sun on a certain day. You go and look, and your sense of sight immediately tells you that their calculations are vindicated. So here you have the evidence of the senses reinforced by the entirely separate evidence of a vast independent process of mathematical reasoning. We have taken what is called in military map-making "a cross bearing." . . . When my metaphysical friends tell me that the data on which the astronomers made their calculations, were necessarily obtained originally through the evidence of the senses, I say, "no." They might, in theory at any rate, be obtained by automatic calculating-machines set in motion by the light falling upon them without admixture of the human senses at any stage. When it is persisted that we should have to be told about the calculations and use our ears for that purpose, I reply that the mathematical process has a reality and virtue in itself, and that once discovered it constitutes a new and independent factor. I am also at this point accustomed to reaffirm with emphasis my conviction that the sun is real, and also that it is hot - in fact hot as Hell, and that if the metaphysicians doubt it they should go there and see.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: Winston S. Churchill, My Early Life, Fontana, London, 1972, pp 123-124.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on army, contentment, idleness, lust, machines, military, rest, work, and world

Hitler is a monster of wickedness, insatiable in his lust for blood and plunder. Not content with having all Europe under his heel, or else terrorized into various forms of abject submission, he must now carry his work of butchery and desolation among the vast multitudes of Russia and of Asia. The terrible military machine, which we and the rest of the civilized world so foolishly, so supinely, so insensately allowed the Nazi gangsters to build up year by year from almost nothing cannot stand idle lest it rust or fall to pieces. . . . So now this bloodthirsty guttersnipe must launch his mechanized armies upon new fields of slaughter, pillage and devastation.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: Radio broadcast on the German invasion of Russia, June 1941

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Strunk, Jr. on machines, reason, words, and writing

Omit needless words. Vigorous writing is concise. A sentence should contain no unnecessary words, a paragraph no unnecessary sentences, for the same reason that a drawing should have no unnecessary lines and a machine no unnecessary parts. This requires not that the writer make all his sentences short, or that he avoid all detail and treat his subjects only in outline, but that every word tell.

William Strunk (1869 - 1946)

Source: Strunk & White in The Elements of Style, 1918, Third Revision, 1979, p. 23.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William G. Carleton on achievement, earth, failure, intelligence, machines, men, paradise, politics, power, security, and world

The machine can free man or enslave him; it can make of this world something resembling a paradise or a purgatory. Men have it within their power to achieve a security hitherto dreamed of only by the philosophers, or they may go the way of the dinosaurs, actually disappearing from the earth because they fail to develop the social and political intelligence to adjust to the world which their mechanical intelligence has created.

William G. Carleton

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Will Durant on acting, machines, majorities, minorities, and politics

The political machine triumphs because it is a united minority acting against a divided majority.

Will Durant (1885 - 1981)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Walter Wilber Gruber on failure, life, machines, and men

There are five types of men who fail in life; the machine, the miser, the hermit, the snob and the brute.

Walter Wilber Gruber

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Walter Lippmann on machines and plants

You cannot endow even the best machine with initiative; the jolliest steamroller will not plant flowers.

Walter Lippmann (1889 - 1974)

Contributed by: Zaady

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