lust

A Quote by Josiah Gilbert Holland on death, faith, god, honor, lust, men, and time

God give us men! A time like this demands. Strong minds, great hearts, true faith, and ready hands; Men whom the lust of office does not kill; Men whom the spoils of office cannot buy; Men who possess opinions and a will; Men who have honor; men who will not die.

Josiah Gilbert Holland (1819 - 1881)

Source: Wanted, 1872

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Tillotson on deception, god, heaven, hope, hospitals, lust, purpose, repentance, words, and world

Let no man deceive you with vain words or vain hopes or false notions of a slight and sudden repentance. As if heaven were a hospital founded on purpose to receive all sick and maimed persons that, when they can live no longer to the lusts of the flesh and the sinful pleasures of this world, can but put up a cold and formal petition to be admitted there. No, no, as sure as God is true, they shall never see the Kingdom of God who, instead of seeking it in the first place, make it their last refuge and retreat.

John Tillotson (1630 - 1694)

Source: Sermons

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jean Baptiste Moliére on honor, lust, and privacy

Then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honor turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust. The grave's a fine and private place But none, I think, do there embrace.

Jean Baptiste Moliere (1622 - 1673)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Thomson on envy, lust, nature, and virtue

A bard here dwelt, more fat than bard be-seems, Who, void of envy, guile, and lust of gain, On virtue still, and nature's pleasing themes, Poured from his unpremeditated strain.

James Thomson (1700 - 1748)

Source: The Castle of Indolence, 1748

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Hugh B. Brown on art, change, children, christ, cities, day, greed, heart, home, labor, life, lust, mankind, men, painting, sons, trouble, wine, and work

An old priest told me this story. "Centuries ago a great artist was engaged to paint a mural for the cathedral in a Sicilian town. The subject was the life of Christ. For many years the artist labored diligently, and finally the painting was finished except for the two most important figures: the Christ Child and Judas Iscariot. He searched far and wide for suitable models. "One day while walking in the city he came upon some children playing in the street. Among them was a 12-year-old boy whose face stirred the painter's heart. "The artist took the child home with him, and day after day the boy sat patiently until the face of the Christ Child was finished. But the painter still had found no model for the portrait of Judas. "The story of the unfinished masterpiece spread afar, and many men, fancying themselves of wicked countenance, offered to pose for Judas. But in vain the old painter looked for Judas, as he envisioned him-a man warped by life, enfeebled by surrender to greed and lust. "Then one afternoon as he sat in a tavern, a gaunt and tattered figure staggered across the threshold. 'Wine, wine,' he begged. The startled painter looked into a face that seemed to bear the marks of every sin of mankind. "Greatly excited, the old painter said, 'Come with me, and I will give you wine.' "For many days the painter worked feverishly to complete his masterpiece. As the work went on, a change came over the model. A strange tension replaced the stuporous languor, and his bloodshot eyes were fixed with horror on the painted likeness of himself. One day, perceiving his subject's agitation, the painter paused in his work. 'My son,' he said, 'what troubles you so?' "The man buried his face in his hands, sobbing. After a long moment he lifted pleading eyes to the old painter's face. "'Do you not then remember me? Years ago I was your model for the Christ Child.'"

Hugh B. Brown (1883 - 1975)

Source: The Abundant Life, p.228, quoting an article by Bonnie Chamberlin printed in Saturday Review

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ezra Pound on language, lust, money, and senses

And the betrayers of language ...... n and the press gang And those who had lied for hire; The perverts, the perverters of language, the perverts, who have set money-lust Before the pleasures of the senses; howling, as of a hen-yard in a printing-house, the clatter of presses, the blowing of dry dust and stray paper, foetor, sweat, the stench of stale oranges.

Ezra Pound (1885 - 1972)

Source: Cantos, 1925—1959, XIV

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on acting, blindness, colors, confusion, good, honor, kindness, knowledge, love, lust, men, music, play, reason, rest, vision, wisdom, and world

You train your eye and your vision lusts after color. You train your ear, and you long for delightful sound. You delight in doing good, and your natural kindness is blown out of shape. You delight in righteousness, and you become righteous beyond all reason. You overdo liturgy, and you turn into a ham actor. Overdo your love of music, and you play corn. Love of wisdom leads to wise contriving. Love of knowledge leads to faultfinding. If men would stay as they really are, taking or leaving these eight delights would make no difference. But if they will not rest in their right state, the eight delights develop like malignant tumors. The world falls into confusion. Since men honour these delights, and lust after them, the world has gone stone-blind. When the delight is over, they still will not let go of it. . . .

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (11:1-2, pp. 103-104)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on clarity, death, driving, failure, fighting, life, lust, men, mind, planning, serenity, sorrow, success, and taoism

The true men of old were not afraid when they stood alone in their views. No great exploits. No plans. If they failed, no sorrow. No self-congratulation in success. . . . The true men of old knew no lust for life, no dread of death. Their entrance was without gladness, their exit, yonder, without resistance. Easy come, easy go. They did not forget where from, nor ask where to, nor drive grimly forward fighting their way through life. They took life as it came, gladly; took death as it came, without care; and went away, yonder. Yonder! They had no mind to fight Tao. They did not try by their own contriving, to help Tao along. These are the ones we call true men. Minds free, thoughts gone. Brows clear, faces serene.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 6:1, pp. 89-90

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Catherine Marshall on appreciation, conflict, education, evil, existence, freedom, friendship, good, government, greed, happiness, hatred, idealism, ignorance, individuality, lies, life, lust, niceness, optimism, pain, people, philosophy, pove

Without realizing what was happening, most of us gradually came to take for granted the premises underlying the philosophy of optimism. We proceeded to live these propositions, though we would not have stated them as blandly as I set them forth here: Man is inherently good. Individual man can carve out his own salvation with the help of education and society through progressively better government. Reality and values worth searching for lie in the material world that science is steadily teaching us to analyze, catalogue, and measure. While we do not deny the existence of inner values, we relegate them to second place. The purpose of life is happiness, [which] we define in terms of enjoyable activity, friends, and the accumulation of material objects. The pain and evil of life - such as ignorance, poverty, selfishness, hatred, greed, lust for power - are caused by factors in the external world; therefore, the cure lies in the reforming of human institutions and the bettering of environmental conditions. As science and technology remove poverty and lift from us the burden of physical existence, we shall automatically become finer persons, seeing for ourselves the value of living the Golden Rule. In time, the rest of the world will appreciate the demonstration that the American way of life is best. They will then seek for themselves the good life of freedom and prosperity. This will be the greatest impetus toward an end of global conflict. The way to get along with people is to beware of religious dictums and dogma. The ideal is to be a nice person and to live by the Creed of Tolerance. Thus we offend few people. We live and let live. This is the American Way.

Catherine Marshall

Source: Beyond Ourselves

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on art, birth, children, greatness, limits, lust, motherhood, passion, power, and value

The lust that drives others to enslave an empire, had become, in her limits, a passion for power over him. She had set out to break him, as if, unable to equal his value, she could surpass it by destroying it, as if the measure of his greatness would thus become the measure of hers, as if the vandal who smashed a statue were greater than the artist who had made it, as if the murderer who killed a child were greater than the mother who had given it birth.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Contributed by: Zaady

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