lovers

A Quote by William Shakespeare on ambition, belief, country, death, fortune, friendship, honor, joy, judgment, life, love, lovers, men, patience, respect, rudeness, senses, silence, slavery, tears, and wisdom

BRUTUS: Be patient till the last. Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause, and be silent, that you may hear: believe me for mine honour, and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe: censure me in your wisdom, and awake your senses, that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: - Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more. Had you rather Caesar were living and die all slaves, than that Caesar were dead, to live all free men? As Caesar loved me, I weep for him; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him: but, as he was ambitious, I slew him. There is tears for his love; joy for his fortune; honour for his valour; and death for his ambition. Who is here so base that would be a bondman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so vile that will not love his country? If any, speak; for him have I offended. I pause for a reply.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on lovers

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All lovers young, all lovers must Consign to thee and come to dust...

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Cymbeline, Act 4, scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on lovers and music

How silver sweet sound lovers' tongues by night, like softest music to attending ears!

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: ROMEO AND JULIET, Act 2, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on grief, lies, love, lovers, madness, and tears

ROMEO Why, such is love's transgression. Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast, Which thou wilt propagate, to have it prest With more of thine: this love that thou hast shown Doth add more grief to too much of mine own. Love is a smoke raised with the fume of sighs; Being purged, a fire sparkling in lovers' eyes; Being vex'd a sea nourish'd with lovers' tears: What is it else? a madness most discreet, A choking gall and a preserving sweet.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: ROMEO AND JULIET, Act 1, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on journeys, lovers, meetings, and sons

Journeys end in lovers meeting, Every wise man's son doth know.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Twelfth Night, Act II, Scene iii

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Butler Yeats on art, death, love, lovers, silence, songs, speech, and wisdom

Speech after long silence; it is right, All other lovers being estranged or dead . . . That we descant and yet again descant Upon the supreme theme of Art and Song: Bodily decrepitude is wisdom; young We loved each other and were ignorant.

William Butler Yeats (1865 - 1939)

Source: The Winding Stair and Other Poems, 1933;. After Long Silence

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Blake on despair, love, and lovers

My silks and fine array, My smiles and languished air, By love are driv'n away And mournful lean Despair Brings me yew to deck my grave: Such end true lovers have.

William Blake (1757 - 1827)

Source: Poetical Sketches , I783. Song (My Silks and Fine Array), st. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Walter Lippmann on endurance, love, and lovers

Love endures only when the lovers love many things together and not merely each other.

Walter Lippmann (1889 - 1974)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Shepler on abuse, beauty, books, jealousy, language, love, lovers, marriage, passion, poetry, and unity

In the 1600's, a language of flowers developed in Constantinople and in the poetry of Persia. Charles II introduced the Persian poetry to Europe, and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu brought the flower language from Turkey to England in 1716. It spread to France and became a handbook of 800 floral messages known as the Book Le Language des Fleurs. Lovers exchanged messages as they gave each other selected flowers or bouquets. A full red rose meant beauty. Red and white mean unity. Crocus said "abuse not", while a white rosebud warns that one is too young for love. Yellow roses were for jealousy, yellow iris for passion, filbert for reconciliation and ivy for marriage.

John Shepler

Source: Valentine's Day Love Traditions, johnshepler.com

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on lovers and understanding

I don't understand why so many "so called" chocolate lovers complain about the calories in chocolate, when all true chocoholics know that it is a vegetable. It comes from the cocoa bean, beans are veggies, 'nuff said.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

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