losing

A Quote by Truman Capote on children, earth, existence, friendship, losing, memory, schools, seasons, water, and world

The true beloveds of this world are in their lover's eyes lilacs opening, ship lights, school bells, a landscape, remembered conversations, friends, a child's Sunday, lost voices, one's favorite suit, autumn and all seasons, memory, yes, it being the earth and water of existence, memory.

Truman Capote (1924 - 1984)

Source: Other Voices, Other Rooms

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Imperator Titus Flavius Sabinus Vespasianus Augustus on day, friendship, and losing

Friends, I have lost a day. -Amici, diem perdidi

Titus (40? - 81 AD)

Source: Suetonius, Titus, sec. 8

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thurgood Marshall on grace, losing, and winning

We can always stick together when we are losing, but tend to find means of breaking up when we're winning. In Grace under Pressure, by Hastie, 1984.

Thurgood Marshall (1908 - 1993)

Source: Grace under Pressure, by Hastie, 1984.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thornton Niven Wilder on children, dogs, losing, and love

Many who have spent a lifetime in it can tell us less of love than the child that lost a dog yesterday.

Thornton Wilder (1897 - 1975)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Vernor Smith on anxiety, army, belief, bitterness, chance, day, death, disaster, dreams, endurance, foolishness, freedom, friendship, glory, government, heart, hope, ignorance, laughter, life, losing, patience, peace, people, pity, powe

No man made great by death offers more hope to lowly pride than does Abraham Lincoln; for while living he was himself so simple as often to be dubbed a fool. Foolish he was, they said, in losing his youthful heart to a grave and living his life on married patience; foolish in pitting his homely ignorance against Douglas, brilliant, courtly, and urbane; foolish in setting himself to do the right in a world where the day goes mostly to the strong; foolish in dreaming of freedom for a long-suffering folk whom the North is as anxious to keep out as the South was to keep down; foolish in choosing the silent Grant to lead to victory the hesitant armies of the North; foolish, finally, in presuming that government for the people must be government of the people and by the people. Foolish many said; foolish many, many believed. This Lincoln, whom so many living friends and foes alike deemed foolish, hid his bitterness in laughter; fed his sympathy on solitude; and met recurring disaster with whimsicality to muffle the murmur of a bleeding heart. Out of the tragic sense of life he pitied where others blamed; bowed his own shoulders with the woes of the weak; endured humanely his little day of chance power; and won through death what life disdains to bestow upon such simple souls - lasting peace and everlasting glory.

Thomas Vernor Smith

Source: Illinois Senate, Feb 12,’35, Lincoln's 126th birthday —Smith, Lincoln, Living Legend, pp. 3-5

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on freedom, liberty, and losing

Our liberty depends on the freedom of the press and that cannot be limited without being lost.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Fuller on books, learning, and losing

Learning hath gained most by those books by which the printers have lost.

Thomas Fuller (1608 - 1661)

Source: Of Books.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Fuller on life, losing, and time

He lives long that lives well, and time misspent is not lived, but lost.

Thomas Fuller (1608 - 1661)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Adams on admiration, christ, losing, men, and time

The Bible is to us what the star was to the wise men; but if we spend all our time in gazing upon it, observing its motions, and admiring its splendor, without being led to Christ by it, the use of it will be lost on us.

Thomas Adams (1871 - 1940)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Terence Kealey on america, computers, country, decisions, economics, electricity, future, generations, government, growth, losing, money, myth, power, projects, research, science, service, success, war, wealth, and world

There is a central myth about British science and economic growth, and it goes like this: science breeds wealth, Britain is in economic decline, therefore Britain has not done enough science. Actually, it is easy to show that a key cause of Britain's economic decline has been that the government has funded too much science. . . . Post-war British science policy illustrates the folly of wasting money on research. The government decided, as it surveyed the ruins of war-torn Europe in 1945, that the future lay in computers, nuclear power and jet aircraft, so successive administrations poured money into these projects-to vast technical success. The world's first commercial mainframe computer was British, sold by Ferrranti in 1951; the world's first commercial jet aircraft was British, the Comet, in service in 1952; the first nuclear power station was British, Calder Hall, commissioned in 1956; and the world's first and only supersonic commercial jet aircraft was Anglo-French, Concorde, in service in 1976. Yet these technical advances crippled us economically, because they were so uncommercial. The nuclear generation of electricity, for example, had lost 2.1 billion pounds by 1975 (2.1 billion pounds was a lot then); Concord had lost us, alone, 2.3 billion pounds by 1976; the Comet crashed and America now dominates computers. Had these vast sums of money not been wasted on research, we would now be a significantly richer country.

Terence Kealey

Source: Terence Kealey Wasting Billions, the Scientific Way, The Sunday Times, Oct. 13, 1996.

Contributed by: Zaady

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