logic

A Quote by Lewis Carroll on kittens, conversation, purring, yes, no, boolean, logic, and agreeableness

It is a very inconvenient habit of kittens (Alice had once made the remark) that, whatever you say to them, they Always purr.  'If them would only purr for "yes" and mew for "no," or any rule of that sort,' she had said, 'so that one could keep up a conversation!  But how can you talk with a person if they always say the same thing?'

Lewis Carroll (1832 - 1898)

Source: Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There, Pages: Chapter 12

Contributed by: Tsuya

A Quote by Lewis Carroll on speaking, politeness, rules, children, seen not heard, speak when spoken to, logic, argument, and conversation

'Speak when you're spoken to!' The Queen sharply interrupted her.
'But if everybody obeyed that rule,' said Alice, who was always ready for a little argument, 'and if you only spoke when you were spoken to, and the other person always waited for you to begin, you see nobody would ever say anything, so that -- '
'Ridiculous!' cried the Queen.  'Why, don't you see, child -- ' here she broke off with a frown, and, after thinking for a minute, suddenly changed the subject of the conversation. 

Lewis Carroll (1832 - 1898)

Source: Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There, Pages: Chapter 9

Contributed by: Tsuya

A Quote by Lewis Carroll on language, french, english, queens, bargains, negotiation, questions, interrogation, nonsense, and logic

'Do you know Languages?  What's the French for fiddle-de-dee?'
'Fiddle-de-dee's not English,' Alice replied gravely.
'Who ever said it was?' said the Red Queen.
Alice thought she saw a way out of the difficulty this time.  'If you'll tell me what language "fiddle-de-dee" is, I'll tell you the French for it!' she exclaimed triumphantly.
But the Red Queen drew herself up rather stiffly, and said 'Queens never make bargains.'
'I wish Queens never asked questions,' Alice thought to herself.

Lewis Carroll (1832 - 1898)

Source: Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There, Pages: Chapter 9

Contributed by: Tsuya

A Quote by Kedar on god, ultimate, question, questioner, philosophy, philosophical, logic, logical, paradox, existence, ontology, and uqv theory

God is the ultimate philosophical questioner, the one who asks the logically paradoxical ultimate philosophical question about the nature of his own existence.

Kedar Joshi

Source: Superultramodern Science and Philosophy

Contributed by: Kedar

A Quote by Samuel Butler on logic

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Logic is like the sword - those who appeal to it shall perish by it.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: The Note-books of Samuel Butler

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by Douglas Adams on logic

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Now logic is a wonderful thing but it has, as the processes of evolution discovered, certain drawbacks.  Anything that thinks logically can be fooled by something else which thinks at least as logically as it does.

Douglas Adams

Source: The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by Lewis Carroll on logic and contrariness

Contrariwise, if it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn't, it ain't.  That's logic.

Lewis Carroll (1832 - 1898)

Source: Through the Looking Glass, Chapter 4

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by Bob Samples on logic and mind

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The metaphoric mind includes rationality, linearity, and logic - for it created them.  But like some children, the rational mind often seems embarrassed by the presence of its parents.

Bob Samples

Source: The Metaphoric Mind: A Celebration of Creative Consciousness

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by Robert Moss on intuition, logic, and wisdom

Strings of coincidence can strengthen us in the determination to follow our deepest intuitions even when they run counter to conventional wisdom and logic and cannot be subjected to rational explanation.

Robert Moss

Source: The Three “Only” Things

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry on discovery, dream, intuition, and logic

The theoretician believes in logic and believes that he despises dreams, intuition, and poetry.  He does not recognize that these three fairies have only disguised themselves in order to dazzle him...  He does not know that he owes his greatest discoveries to them.

Antoine de Saint-Exupery (1900 - 1944)

Source: Wartime Writings 1939-1944

Contributed by: ingebrita

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