literature

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on authors, enemies, imperfection, kindness, literature, tenderness, and vices

SATIRE, n. An obsolete kind of literary composition in which the vices and follies of the author's enemies were expounded with imperfect tenderness.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on literature

PUBLISH, n. In literary affairs, to become the fundamental element in a cone of critics.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on departure, glory, literature, mortality, popularity, thought, truth, and words

PLATITUDE, n. The fundamental element and special glory of popular literature. A thought that snores in words that smoke. All that is mortal of a departed truth. A jelly-fish withering on the shore of the sea of thought. A desiccated epigram.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on honor, literature, and plagiarism

PLAGIARISM, n. A literary coincidence compounded of a discreditable priority and an honorable subsequence.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on art, literature, and novelty

NOVEL, n. A short story padded. A species of composition bearing the same relation to literature that the panorama bears to art. As it is too long to be read at a sitting the impressions made by its successive parts are successively effaced, as in the pa

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on growth, language, literature, and work

DICTIONARY, n. A malevolent literary device for cramping the growth of a language and making it hard and inelastic. This [my] dictionary, however, is a most useful work.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Amado Nervo on literature and understanding

The literary man has a circle of the chosen few who read him and become his only public. . . . What more natural than that he should write for those who, even if they do not pay him, at least understand him?

Amado Nervo (1870 - 1919)

Source: Nuestra Literatura (Mexican literature) 1899

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Algernon Charles Swinburne on literature, poets, and sentimentality

It is long since Mr. Carlyle expressed his opinion that if any poet or other literary creature could really be "killed off by one critique" or many, the sooner he was so despatched the better; a sentiment in which I for one humbly but heartily concur.

Algernon Swinburne (1837 - 1909)

Source: Under the Microscope.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on literature, memory, and privacy

Every man's memory is his private literature.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Edward Housman on discrimination, good, hope, literature, perception, and pleasure

Good literature continually read for pleasure must, let us hope, do some good to the reader: must quicken his perception though dull, and sharpen his discrimination though blunt, and mellow the rawness of his personal opinions.

A.E. Housman (1859 - 1936)

Source: The Name and Nature of Poetry

Contributed by: Zaady

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