literary theory

A Quote by Sol Luckman on beginners luke, herman melville, reality, imagination, consciousness, drummon light, theater, character, protagonist, teacher, tradition, hope diamond, enlightenment, writing, writing light, literary theory, manifesto, and ars p

Once in every generation, if we’re lucky, a character shows up who can teach us about reality because he’s more real than ourselves. Melville called such a character a “Drummond light” after the type of light once used in theaters that was capable of providing illumination in many directions. May one of us create such a character. Better yet, let’s buck tradition and create a string of Drummond lights, each a brilliant facet of the Hope Diamond that is our new fiction. Let’s turn away, once and for all, from old Enlightenment tropes toward a new narrative of Enwritenment. Together let’s write light.

Sol Luckman

Source: Beginner's Luke: Book I of the Beginner's Luke Series, Pages: 10..11

Contributed by: Leigh

A Quote by Sol Luckman on beginners luke, sol luckman, literary movement, literature, writing, novel, literary theory, literary criticism, ars poetica, inspiration, and humor

Let’s begin a new literary movement. I don’t care what we call it. Let’s start writing novels for people who don't like novels. Because these days who can blame them? You can please all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you can’t please all the people all the time. So let’s at least please ourselves.

Sol Luckman

Source: Beginner's Luke: Book I of the Beginner's Luke Series, Pages: 10

Contributed by: Celena

A Quote by Sol Luckman on theory, literary theory, criticism, soul, literature, beginners luke, sol luckman, art, science, writing, writer, prose, fiction, knowledge, postmodernism, and novel

Theory does everything in its power to remove the living soul of literature, tear its heart out, make of the study of Art a hard-edged Science. Never mind that Art is as far removed from measurement as Science is from love. As writers confronting theory, it’s incumbent on us not to let our prose dry up in that desert, but to allow it to become a desert rose, our prose, flourishing in the heat and sands of what passes for knowledge.

Sol Luckman

Source: Beginner's Luke: Book I of the Beginner's Luke Series, Pages: 8

Contributed by: Leigh

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