listening

A Quote by Jane Goodall on change, listening, dialogue, willingness, insight, and jane goodall

“Change happens by listening and then starting a dialogue with the people who are doing something you don't believe is right.”

Jane Goodall

Source: Thinkexist.com

Contributed by: Zoe

A Quote by Huston Smith on listening, religion, understanding, compassion, wisdom, and love

Understanding, then, can lead to love. But the revese is also true. Love brings understanding; the two are reciprocal. So we must listen to understand, but we must also listen to put into play the compassion that the wisdom traditions all enjoin, for it is impossible to love another without hearing that other. If we are to be true to these religions, we must attend to others as deeply and as alertly as we hope that they will attend to us; Thomas Merton made this point by saying that God speaks to us in three places: tin scripture, in our deepest selves, and in the voices of the stranger. We must have the graciousness to receive as well as to give, for there is no greater way to depersonalize another than to speak without also listening.

Huston Smith

Source: The World's Religions: Our Great Wisdom Traditions, Pages: 390

Contributed by: Joshua

A Quote by Kahlil Gibran on listening, words, meaning, peace, silence, thought, bird, talking, fly, speaking, solitutde, meditation, chatter, gossip, and drapery talk

You talk when you cease to be at peace with your thoughts;
And when you can no longer dwell in the solitude of your heart you live in your lips, and sound is a diversion and a pastime.
And in much of your talking, thinking is half murdered.
For thought is a bird of space, that in a cage of words may indeed unfold its wings but cannot fly.

Kahlil Gibran (1883 - 1931)

Source: The Prophet: 26 poetic essays, Pages: 60 (On Talking)

Contributed by: Joy Bringer

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on courage and listening

Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Purkey on dance, earth, heaven, listening, and love

Dance like no one is watching, Love like you'll never be hurt, Sing like no one is listening, Live like it's heaven on earth.

William Purkey

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Morihei Ueshiba on books, good, learning, listening, mountains, people, plants, study, teachers, truth, water, words, and world

Contemplate the workings of this world, listen to the words of the wise, take all that is good as your own. With this as your base, open your won door to truth. Do not overlook the truth that is right before you. Study how water flows in a valley stream, smoothly and freely between the rocks. Also learn from holy books and wise people. Everything-even mountains, rivers, plants, and trees-should be your teacher.

Morihei Ueshiba

Source: The Art of Peace

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mevlana Jelalu'ddin Rumi on learning, listening, and order

Since in order to speak, one must first listen, learn to speak by listening.

Mevlana Rumi (1207 - 1273)

Source: Rumi Daylight: A Daybook of Spiritual Guidance

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Leo F. Buscaglia on caring, compliments, honesty, kindness, life, listening, potential, and power

Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around.

Leo F. Buscaglia

Source: Love

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Denis Waitley on children, decisions, desires, and listening

Listen to the desires of your children. Encourage them and then give them the autonomy to make their own decision.

Denis Waitley

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William S. Ogdon on art, birds, character, clarity, conscience, contentment, control, determination, discovery, economics, effort, enemies, ethics, fashion, goodness, government, happiness, heart, individuality, life, listening, luxury, money,

The Art of Happiness There was never a time when so much official effort was being expended to produce happiness, and probably never a time when so little attention was paid by the individual to creating and personal qualities that make for it. What one misses most today is the evidence of widespread personal determination to develop a character that will, in itself, given any reasonable odds, make for happiness. Our whole emphasis is on the reform of living conditions, of increased wages, of controls on the economic structure-the government approach-and so little on man improving himself. The ingredients of happiness are so simple that they can be counted on one hand. Happiness comes from within, and rests most securely on simple goodness and clear conscience. Religion may not be essential to it, but no one ins known to have gained it without a philosophy resting on ethical principles. Selfishness is its enemy; to make another happy is to be happy one's self. It is quiet, seldom found for long in crowds, most easily won in moments of solitude and reflection. It cannot be bought; indeed, money has very little to do with it. No one is happy unless he is reasonably well satisfied with himself, so that the quest for tranquility must of necessity begin with self-examination. We shall not often be content with what we discover in this scrutiny. There is much to do, and so little done. Upon this searching self-analysis, however, depends the discovery of those qualities that make each man unique, and whose development alone can bring satisfaction. Of all those who have tried, down the ages, to outline a program for happiness, few have succeeded so well as William Henry Channing, chaplain of the House of Representatives in the middle of the last century: "To live content with small means; so seek elegance rather than luxury, and refinement rather than fashion; to be worthy . . . to study hard, think quietly, talk gently, act frankly; to listen to the stars and birds, to babes and sages, with open heart; to bear all cheerfully, do all bravely, await occasions, hurry never; in a word to let the spiritual, unbidden and unconscious, grow up through the common." It will be noted that no government can do this for you; you must do it for yourself.

William S. Ogdon

Source: New York Times, Editorial Page, Dec. 30, 1945

Contributed by: Zaady

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