limits

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on fate and limits

Whatever limits us, we call Fate.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Price Pritchett, Ph.D. on achievement and limits

Until I test the limits to what I can achieve, I won't really know how well I can do.

Price Pritchett

Source: you2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Orison Swett Marden on limits and possibility

Our thoughts and imaginations are the only real limits to our possibilities.

Orison Swett Marden (1850 - 1924)

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A Quote by O. Henry on danger, honesty, and limits

There is no well-defined boundary between honesty and dishonesty. The frontiers of one blend with the outside limits of the other, and he who attempts to tread this dangerous ground may be sometimes in one domain and sometimes in the other.

O. Henry (1862 - 1910)

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A Quote by Nathaniel Hawthorne on happiness, impulses, limits, men, and world

The world owes all its onward impulses to men ill at ease.  The happy man inevitably confines himself within ancient limits.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804 - 1864)

Source: The House of the Seven Gables

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A Quote by Michel Eyquem de Montaigne on limits, nobility, privilege, time, and truth

For truth itself does not have the privilege to be employed at any time and in every way; its use, noble as it is, has its circumscriptions and limits.

Michel Montaigne (1533 - 1592)

Source: Essais

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A Quote by Marcus Aurelius Antoninus on body, evil, imagination, intelligence, limits, mind, pain, power, serenity, soul, sympathy, present, thought, and tranquility

In every pain let this thought be present, that there is no dishonor in it, nor does it make the governing intelligence worse. Indeed, in the case of most pains, let this remark of Epicurus aid thee, that pain is neither intolerable nor everlasting - if thou bearest in mind that it has its limits, and if thou addest nothing to it in imagination. Pain is either an evil to the body (then let the body say what it thinks of it!)-or to the soul. But it is in the power of the soul to maintain its own serenity and tranquility, and not to think that pain is an evil. . . . It will suffice thee to remember as concerning pain . . . that the mind may, by stopping all manner of commerce and sympathy with the body, still retain its own tranquility.

Marcus Aurelius (121 - 180)

Source: Meditations

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marcus Aurelius Antoninus on bitterness, body, evil, imagination, limits, mind, pain, power, serenity, soul, tranquility, world, and path

Is your cucumber bitter? Throw it away. Are there briars in your path? Turn aside. That is enough. Do not go on and say, "Why were things of this sort ever brought into this world?" neither intolerable nor everlasting - if thou bearest in mind that it has its limits, and if thou addest nothing to it in imagination. Pain is either an evil to the body (then let the body say what it thinks of it!)-or to the soul. But it is in the power of the soul to maintain its own serenity and tranquility. . . .

Marcus Aurelius (121 - 180)

Source: Meditations

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marquise Magdeleine de Sablé on charity, limits, love, and self-love

There is always enough self-love hidden beneath the greatest devoutness to set limits on charity.

Magdeleine Sable (c. 1599 - 1678)

Source: the Marquise Sablé’s work is in Maxims and Various Thoughts (Maximes et pensées diverses) 1678

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John William Navin Sullivan on experience, god, ideas, imagination, limits, logic, mathematics, principles, science, universe, and world

The mathematician is entirely free, within the limits of his imagination, to construct what worlds he pleases. What he is to imagine is a matter for his own caprice; he is not thereby discovering the fundamental principles of the universe nor becoming acquainted with the ideas of God. If he can find, in experience, sets of entities which obey the same logical scheme as his mathematical entities, then he has applied his mathematics to the external world; he has created a branch of science.

John William Navin Sullivan (1886 - 1937)

Source: Aspects of Science, 1925.

Contributed by: Zaady

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