lies

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on chance, lies, truth, and world

A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on children, crisis, future, home, honor, hope, hospitals, lies, play, preachers, sacrifice, scientists, service, struggle, time, victory, war, women, and world

This is no time to speak of the hopes of the future, or the broader world which lies beyond our struggles and our victory. We have to win that world for our children. We have to win it by our sacrifices. We have not won it yet. The crisis is upon us. . . . In this strange, terrible world war there is a place for everyone, man and woman, old and young, hale and halt; service in a thousand forms is open. There is no room now for the dilettante, the weakling, for the shirker, or the sluggard. The mine, the factory, the dockyard, the salt sea waves, the fields to till, the home, the hospital, the chair of the scientist, the pulpit of the preacher - from the highest to the humblest tasks, all are of equal honor; all have their part to play.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: Speech to the Canadian Senate and House of Commons, Ottawa, December 30, 1941

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on lies and truth

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In wartime, truth is so precious that she should always be attended by a bodyguard of lies.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on god, heart, and lies

Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep! The river glideth at his own sweet will; Dear God! the very houses seem asleep; And all that mighty heart is lying still!

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Earth has not anything to show more fair.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on beginning, birth, children, day, death, dreams, earth, fatherhood, glory, god, heart, heaven, home, joy, lies, life, nature, past, perception, sleep, soul, time, travel, vision, wishes, and youth

"My heart leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the sky: So it was when my life began; So it is now I am a man; So be it when I shall grow old, Or let me die! The Child is Father of the Man; And I could wish my days to be Bound each to each by natural piety." There was a time when meadow, grove, and stream, The earth, and every common sight, To me did seem Apparelled in celestial light, The glory and the freshness of a dream, It is not now as it hath been of yore ;- Turn whereso'er I may, By night or day, The things which I have seen I now can see no more. . . . . But yet I know, where'er I go, That there hath past away a glory from the earth. . . . . Our birth is but a sleep and a forgetting; The Soul that rises with us, our life's Star, Hath had elsewhere its setting, And cometh from afar: Not in entire forgetfulness, And not in utter nakedness, But trailing clouds of glory do we come From God, who is our home: Heaven lies about us in our infancy! Shades of the prison-house begin to close Upon the growing Boy, But He beholds the light, and whence it flows, And sees it in his joy; The Youth, who daily farther from the east Must travel, still is Nature's Priest, And by the vision splendid Is on his way attended; At length the Man perceives it die away, And fade into the light of common day.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: “Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood”

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on birth, glory, god, heaven, home, lies, life, sleep, and soul

Our birth is but a sleep and a forgetting: The soul that rises with us, our life's star, Hath had elsewhere its setting, And cometh from afar. Not in entire forgetfulness, And not in utter nakedness, But trailing clouds of glory, do we come From God, who is our home: Heaven lies about us in our infancy.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Intimations of Immortality. Stanza 5.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on bliss, company, dance, heart, lies, loneliness, pleasure, poets, solitude, thought, and wealth

I wander'd lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the Milky Way, They stretch'd in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay; Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. The waves beside them danced; but they Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: A poet could not but be gay, In such a jocund company: I gazed-and gazed-but little thought What wealth the show to me had brought: For oft, when on my couch I lie In vacant or in pensive mood, They flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills; And dances with the daffodils.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on lies and tears

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To me the meanest flower that blows can give Thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Intimations of Immortality. Stanza 11.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on faults, lies, and men

Roses have thorns, and silver fountains mud; Clouds and eclipses stain both moon and sun, And loathsome canker lies in sweetest bud. All men make faults.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Sonnet 35

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A Quote by William Shakespeare on cities, conscience, cowardice, danger, gold, lies, obstacles, persuasion, reward, spirit, trust, and wives

FIRST MURDERER: WHERE IS THY CONSCIENCE NOW? SECOND MURDERER: In the Duke of Gloucester's purse FIRST MURDERER: So when he opens his purse to give us our reward, thy conscience flies out. SECOND MURDERER: Let it go; there's few or none will entertain it. FIRST MURDERER: How if it come to thee again? SECOND MURDERER: I'll not meddle with it: it is a dangerous thing: it makes a man a coward: a man cannot steal, but it accuseth him; he cannot swear, but it checks him; he cannot lie with his neighbour's wife, but it detects him: it is a blushing shamefast spirit that multiplies in a man's bosom; it fills one full of obstacles: it made me once restore a purse of gold, that I found: it beggars any man that keeps it: it is turned out of all towns and cities for a dangerous thing; and every man that means to live well, endeavours to trust to himself and to live without it. FIRST MURDERER: 'Zounds, it is even now at my elbow, persuading me not to kill the duke.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Richard III, Act I, scene iv

Contributed by: Zaady

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