liberty

A Quote by Saba Sophiya Hasan on liberty, self-discovery, self-knowledge, humility, self-respect, success, and acceptance

Let the river flow and you will be liberated. Let yourself go with current and you will find yourself. Let the wind so blow and you will be able to break yourself free very much like a ripened fruit of self-respect that sheds itself away from the tree of dependence. Let yourself be blown away humbling as a fallen petal and you will find yourself above the lowly dust of ground, to finally discover the truth of your existence for yourself.

Saba Hasan

Source: Beyond Those Horizons: An Epic Novelette

Contributed by: ParadiseBliss

A Quote by Ludwig von Mises on money, wealth, liberty, freedom, and economics

It is impossible to grasp the meaning of the idea of sound money if one does not realize that it was devised as an instrument for the protection of civil liberties against despotic inroads on the part of governments.

Ludwig von Mises

Source: The Theory of Money and Credit, p. 454.

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Franklin Delano Roosevelt on liberty, democracy, power, state, gascism, government, and ownership

The liberty of a democracy is not safe if the people tolerate the growth of private power to the point where it becomes stronger than their democratic State itself. That, in its essence, is Fascism -- ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any controlling private power.

Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882 - 1945)

Contributed by: Barry

A Quote by Frédéric Bastiat on justice, law, freedom, and liberty

It is in the nature of men to react against the iniquity of which they are the victims. When, therefore, plunder is organized by the law for the profit of the classes who make it, all the plundered classes seek, by peaceful or revolutionary means, to enter into the making of the laws. These classes, according to the degree of enlightenment they have achieved, can propose two different ends to themselves when they thus seek to attain their political rights: either they may wish to bring legal plunder to an end, or they may aim at getting their share of it.

Frédéric Bastiat

Source: http://www.econlib.org/library/Bastiat/basEss2.html

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Ludwig von Mises on economy, free will, liberty, and freedom

Neither the entrepreneurs nor the farmers nor the capitalists determine what has to be produced. The consumers do that.

Ludwig von Mises

Source: Human Action: A Treatise on Economics (Scholars Edition), Pages: 270

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Ludwig von Mises on economy, liberty, freedom, and cooperation

The market economy is the social system of the division of labor under private ownership of the means of production. Everybody acts on his own behalf; but everybodys actions aim at the satisfaction of other peoples needs as well as at the satisfaction of his own. Everybody in acting serves his fellow citizens.

Ludwig von Mises

Source: Human Action: A Treatise on Economics (Scholars Edition), Pages: 258

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Ludwig von Mises on liberty, freedom, happiness, government, and politics

Government means always coercion and compulsion and is by necessity the opposite of liberty.

Ludwig von Mises

Source: Human Action: A Treatise on Economics (Scholars Edition), Pages: 283

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Ludwig von Mises on economy, politics, freedom, liberty, and government

Once the principle is admitted that it is duty of government to protect the individual against his own foolishness, no serious objections can be advanced against further encroachments.

Ludwig von Mises

Source: Human Action: A Treatise on Economics (Scholars Edition), Pages: 728..729

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Ludwig von Mises on happiness, freedom, and liberty

Nobody is in a position to decree what should make a fellow man happier.

Ludwig von Mises

Source: Human Action: A Treatise on Economics (Scholars Edition), Pages: 14

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Newton on liberty, freedom, law, government, and law

All of the services commonly thought to require the State—from the coining of money to police protection to the development of law in defense of the rights of person and property—can be and have been supplied far more efficiently and certainly more morally by private persons. The State is in no sense required by the nature of man; quite the contrary.

Murray Rothbard

Source: The Ethics of Liberty, Pages: 188

Contributed by: peter

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