liberty

A Quote by Ayn Rand on public interest, common good, idealism, subsidies, legislation, power, liberty, and freedom

All "public interest' legislation (and any distribution of money taken by force from some men for the unearned benefit of others) comes down ultimately to the grant of an undefined undefinable, non-objective, arbitrary power to some government officials. The worst aspect of it is not that such a power can be used dishonestly, but that it cannot be used honestly. The wisest man in the world, with the purest integrity, cannot find a criterion for the just, equitable, rational application of an unjust, inequitable, irrational principle.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on liberty and democracy

"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch.  Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote."

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: jeepdog

A Quote by Ludwig von Mises on freedom, liberty, cencorship, approval, and subjectivism

It is completely in accord with the etatist thinking prevalent everywhere today to consider a theory to be finally disposed of merely because the authorities who control appointments to academic positions, want to know nothing of it, and to see the criterion of truth in the approval of a government office.

Ludwig von Mises

Source: Source: p.196 Epistemological Problems of Economics, 3rd edition; 2003; Ludwig von Mises Institute

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Frank Chodorov on ethics, taxation, rights, liberty, freedom, state, robbery, and property right

If we assume that the individual has an indisputable right to life, we must concede that he has a similar right to the enjoyment of the products of his labor. This we call a property right. The absolute right to property follows from the original right to life because one without the other is meaningless; the means to life must be identified with life itself. If the state has a prior right to the products of one’s labor, his right to existence is qualified . . . no such prior rights can be established, except by declaring the state the author of all rights. . . . We object to the taking of our property by organized society just as we do when a single unit of society commits the act. In the latter case we unhesitatingly call the act robbery, a malum in se. It is not the law which in the first instance defines robbery, it is an ethical principle, and this the law may violate but not supersede. If by the necessity of living we acquiesce to the force of law, if by long custom we lose sight of the immorality, has the principle been obliterated? Robbery is robbery, and no amount of words can make it anything else.

Frank Chodorov

Source: http://blog.mises.org/archives/007385.asp

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Theodore Roosevelt on freedom, liberty, and president

To announce that there must be no criticism of the president, or that we are to stand by the president, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public.

Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919)

Contributed by: Dextah

A Quote by Herbert Clark Hoover on freedom, liberty, media, press, freedom of speech, first amendment, constitution, rights, and america

Absolute freedom of the press to discuss public questions is a foundation stone of American liberty.

Herbert Clark Hoover (1874 - 1964)

Source: Herbert Clark Hoover (US President, 1929-1933)

Contributed by: Dextah

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on trial by jury, freedom of religion, freedom of the press, habeas corpus, laws, standing army, and liberty

"It astonishes me to find... [that so many] of our countrymen... should be contented to live under a system which leaves to their governors the power of taking from them the trial by jury in civil cases, freedom of religion, freedom of the press, freedom of commerce, the habeas corpus laws, and of yoking them with a standing army. This is a degeneracy in the principles of liberty... which I [would not have expected for at least] four centuries." --Thomas Jefferson to William Stephens Smith, 1788. (*) FE 5:3

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Contributed by: Chad

A Quote by Ludwig VonMises on ludwig von mises, liberty, libertarian, government, and parasitic government

"It is important to remember that government interference always means either violent action or the threat of such action. The funds that a government spends for whatever purposes are levied by taxation. And taxes are paid because the taxpayers are afraid of offering resistance to the tax gatherers. They know that any disobedience or resistance is hopeless. As long as this is the state of affairs, the government is able to collect the money that it wants to spend. Government is in the last resort the employment of armed men, of policemen, gendarmes, soldiers, prison guards, and hangmen. The essential feature of government is the enforcement of its decrees by beating, killing, and imprisoning. Those who are asking for more government interference are asking ultimately for more compulsion and less freedom."  Ludwig Von Mises

Ludwig VonMises

Source: http://gloomdoom.com/thewisdomoflvm.html

Contributed by: Little Big O

A Quote by George Washington on politics, laws, freedom, and liberty

It will be found an unjust and unwise jealousy to deprive someone of their natural liberty upon the supposition they might abuse it. [gender-netural wording added.]

George Washington (1732 - 1799)

Contributed by: 1Vector3

A Quote by George Washington on government, freedom, liberty, history, and laws

The marvel of all history is the patience with which men and women submit to burdens unnecessarily laid upon them by their governments.

George Washington (1732 - 1799)

Contributed by: 1Vector3

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