libertarianism

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, character, modernity, scientism, capitalism, truth, nature, culture, ideology, egalitarianism, hierarchicalism, libertarianism, values, principles, preconceptions, and logic

The worldview of modern scientism and capitalism are profoundly wrongheaded, rooted in an artificialism and arbitrarialism that cannot begin to see the primordial truth of the way nature actually works, in animals and in ourselves as well. All modern culture and ideology that try to disestablish these principles -- radical egalitarianism, capitalist or bourgeois materialist-artificialist hierarchicalism, arbitrarial libertarianism, etc. -- are flying in the face of the headwinds of both nature and values, the tides of human nature and human character. But these ideologies' fallacies are incomprehensible to them just because their culture systematically prohibits them from thinking about issues at the level of structural principles, of ultimate preconceptions: nothing but good pedestrian mechanical bourgeois logic, as remote as it can possibly be from philosophy.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by James Dunavant on libertarianism

For those of you who may not understand libertarianism, it is really quite simple:

1) No individual has the moral authority to initiate aggression against another individual.
2) No individual or group has the moral authority to initiate aggression against another individual or group by calling themselves "the government."

James Dunavant

Source: http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig9/dunavant1.html

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Avram Noam Chomsky on libertarianism, extremism, and the right

There isn't much point arguing about the word "libertarian." It would make about as much sense to argue with an unreconstructed Stalinist about the word "democracy" -- recall that they called what they'd constructed "peoples' democracies." The weird offshoot of ultra-right individualist anarchism that is called "libertarian" here happens to amount to advocacy of perhaps the worst kind of imaginable tyranny, namely unaccountable private tyranny. If they want to call that "libertarian," fine; after all, Stalin called his system "democratic." But why bother arguing about it?

Noam Chomsky (1928 -)

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Milton Friedman on freedom and libertarianism

The great advances of civilization, whether in architecture or painting, in science or literature, in industry or agriculture, have never come from centralized government. Columbus did not set out to seek a new route to China in response to a majority directive of a parliament, though he was partly financed by an absolute monarch. Newton and Liebnitz; Einstein and Bohr; Shakespeare, Milton, and Pasternak; Whitney, McCormick, Edison, and Ford; Jane Addams, Florence Nightingale, and Albert Scweitzer; no one of these opened new frontiers in human knowledge and understanding, in literature, in technical possibilities, or in the relief of human misery in response to governmental directives. Their achievements were the product of individual genius, of strongly held minority views, of a social climate permitting variety and diversity.        

Milton Friedman (1912 - 2006)

Source: Capitalism and Freedom: Fortieth Anniversary Edition, Pages: 4

Contributed by: Brian

A Quote by Ludwig von Mises on libertarianism, government, freedom, and serfdom

...this remedy is the power of the citizens; they have to prevent the establishment of such an autocratic regime that arrogates to itself a higher wisdom than that of the average citizen. This is the fundamental difference between freedom and serfdom.

Ludwig von Mises

Source: Economic Policy: Thoughts for Today and Tomorrow, Pages: 54

Contributed by: Brian

A Quote by Ludwig von Mises on libertarianism and government

Thus, the isolated interference with one or a few prices of consumer goods always bring about effects--and this is important to realize--which are even less satisfactory than the conditions that prevailed before.

Ludwig von Mises

Source: Economic Policy: Thoughts for Today and Tomorrow, Pages: 45

Contributed by: Brian

A Quote by Ludwig von Mises on libertarianism and government

These people talk of a "middle-of-the-road" policy. What they do not see is that the isolated interference, which means the interference with only one small part of the economic system, brings about a situation which the governement itself--and the people who are asking for government interference--find worse than the conditions they wish to abolish: the people who are asking for rent control are very angry when they discover there is a shortage of apartments and a shortage of housing.

Ludwig von Mises

Source: Economic Policy: Thoughts for Today and Tomorrow, Pages: 51

Contributed by: Brian

A Quote by Ludwig von Mises on capitalism, communism, freedom, government, morality, and libertarianism

If you give the government the right to determine the consumption of the human body, to determine whether one should smoke or not smoke, drink or not drink, there is no good reply you can give to people who say, "More important than the body is the mind and the soul, and man hurts himself much more by reading bad books, by listening to bad music and looking at bad movies. Therefore it is the duty of the government to prevent people from committing those faults.

And, as you know, for many hundreds of years governments and authorities velieved that it was their duty.

Ludwig von Mises

Source: Economic Policy: Thoughts for Today and Tomorrow, Pages: 22

Contributed by: Brian

A Quote by Ludwig von Mises on libertarianism and government

A famous, very often quoted phrase says: "That government is best, which governs least." I do not believe this to be a correct description of of the functions of a good government. Government ought to do all the things for which it is needed and for which it is established. Government ought to protect the individuals within the country against the violent and fraudulent attacks of gangsters, and it should defend the country against foreign enemies. These are the functions of government within a free system, within the system of the market economy.    

Ludwig von Mises

Source: Economic Policy: Thoughts for Today and Tomorrow, Pages: 37

Contributed by: Brian

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