legends

A Quote by George Polyá on correction, difficulty, generations, legends, losing, mathematics, order, popularity, principles, science, and solution

The traditional mathematics professor of the popular legend is absentminded. He usually appears in public with a lost umbrella in each hand. He prefers to face the blackboard and to turn his back to the class. He writes a, he says b, he means c; but it should be d. Some of his sayings are handed down from generation to generation. "In order to solve this differential equation you look at it till a solution occurs to you." "This principle is so perfectly general that no particular application of it is possible." "Geometry is the science of correct reasoning on incorrect figures." "My method to overcome a difficulty is to go round it." "What is the difference between method and device? A method is a device which you used twice."

George Polya

Source: How to Solve It. Princeton: Princeton University Press. 1945.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles M. Skinner on buddhism, certainty, christianity, faith, garden, ideas, leadership, legends, life, meaning, plants, and religion

Larger and finer meanings are read into the older legends of the plants, and the universality of certain myths is expressed in the concurrence of ideas in the beginnings of the great religions. One of the first figures in the leading cosmologies is a tree of life guarded by a serpent. In the Judaic faith this was the tree in the garden of Eden; the Scandinavians made it an ash, Ygdrasil; Christians usually specify the tree as an apple, Hindus as a soma, Persians as a homa, Cambodians as a talok; this early treee is the vine of Bacchus, the snake-entwined caduceus of Mercury, the twining creeper of the Eddas, the bohidruma of Buddha, the fig of Isaiah, the tree of Aesculapius with the serpent around his trunk.

Charles M. Skinner

Source: Myths and Legends of Flowers, Trees, Fruits and Plants, 1911

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on achievement, assumptions, charity, fighting, giving, ideas, legends, life, luxury, meaning, mediocrity, needs, pity, power, virtue, and wealth

It is said that [Robin Hood] fought against the looting rulers and returned the loot to those who had been robbed, but that is not the meaning of the legend which has survived. He is remembered, not as a champion of property, but as a champion of need, not as a defender of the robbed, but as a provider of the poor. He is held to be the first man who assumed a halo of virtue by practicing charity with wealth which he did not own, by giving away goods which he had not produced, by making others pay for the luxury of his pity. He is the man who became the symbol of the idea that need, not achievement, is the source of rights, that we don't have to produce, only to want, that the earned does not belong to us, but the unearned does. He became a justification for every mediocrity who, unable to make his own living, had demanded the power to dispose of the property of his betters, by proclaiming his willingness to devote his life to his inferiors at the price of robbing his superiors.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: (Atlas 534)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Allen Lacy on angels, christmas, jesus, legends, and pity

An angel, legend has it, took pity on a little shepherd girl who had nothing to give to the Infant Jesus in his manger. The angel handed her a weed, but first transformed it into this beautiful flower of winter. [- the Christmas rose, Helleborus niger.]

Allen Lacy

Source: The Gardener's Eye, 1991, p. 14

Contributed by: Zaady

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