laws

A Quote by François Marie Arouet Voltaire on country, laws, and weakness

A multitude of laws in a country is like a great number of physicians, a sign of weakness and malady.

Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Victor L. Brown on achievement, laws, life, needs, power, principles, and purpose

The law of the fast benefits both those who fast and those who stand in need. . . . In addition to providing the means for taking care of the poor among us, fasting is a principle of power which helps us to individually achieve righteous purposes in our lives.

Victor L. Brown (1914 - 1995)

Source: Conference Report, November 1977, Pg. 82

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by U.S. Supreme Court on action, belief, debate, decisions, goals, government, heart, idealism, ideas, information, laws, lies, life, persuasion, politics, principles, rest, risk, and speech

At the heart of the First Amendment lies the principle that each person should decide for him or herself the ideas and beliefs deserving of expression, consideration, and adherence. Our political system and cultural life rest upon this ideal. Government action that stifles speech on account of its message, or that requires the utterance of a particular message favored by the Government, contravenes this essential right. Laws of this sort pose the inherent risk that the Government seeks not to advance a legitimate regulatory goal, but to suppress unpopular ideas or information or manipulate the public debate through coercion rather than persuasion.

U.S. Supreme Court

Source: 1994, Turner Broadcasting System v. FCC, 114 S. Ct. 2445, 2458

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ursula K. Le Guin on art, boredom, children, despair, evil, facts, habits, happiness, intelligence, joy, laws, life, losing, maturity, nobility, pain, passion, people, police, praise, rules, secrets, simplicity, slavery, society, stupidity, tr

They did not use swords, or keep slaves. They were not barbarians. I do not know the rules and laws of their society, but I suspect that they were singularly few. As they did without monarchy and slavery, so they also got on without the stock exchange, the advertisement, the secret police, and the bomb. Yet I repeat that these were not simple folk, not dulcet shepherds, noble savages, bland utopians. They were not less complex than us. The trouble is that we have a bad habit, encouraged by pedants and sophisticates, of considering happiness as something rather stupid. Only pain is intellectual, only evil interesting. This is the treason of the artist: a refusal to admit the banality of evil and the terrible boredom of pain. If you can't lick 'em, join 'em. If it hurts, repeat it. But to praise despair is to condemn delight, to embrace violence is to lose hold of everything else. We have almost lost hold, we can no longer describe a happy man, nor make any celebration of joy. How can I tell you about the people of Omelas? They were not naive and happy children - though their children were, in fact happy. They were mature, intelligent, passionate adults whose lives were not wretched

Ursula K. Le Guin (1929 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on divinity, economics, laws, life, and worth

As is the inner, so is the outer; as is the great, so is the small; as it is above, so it is below; there is but One Life and Law: and he that worth it is One. Nothing is inner, nothing is outer; nothing is great, nothing is small; nothing is high, nothing is low, in the Divine Economy.

unknown

Source: Hermetic Axiom

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on laws and problems

The problem with any unwritten law is that you don't know where to go to erase it.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Douglas Hofstadter on laws

in

It always takes longer than you expect, even when you take Hofstadter's Law into account.

Douglas Hofstadter

Source: Hofstadter's Law

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on laws, people, wealth, weal, supreme, and well-being

Judges ought above all to remember the conclusion of the Roman Twelve Tables :The supreme law of all is the weal [weatlh/ well-being] of the people.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: The Works of Francis Bacon By Francis Bacon, Robert Leslie Ellis, P.269

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on absence, argument, assumptions, congress, government, history, laws, power, and service

The Government contends . . . that the earliest Congresses enacted statutes that required the participation of state officials in the implementation of federal laws . . . we do not think the early statues imposing obligations on state courts imply a power of Congress to impress the state executive into its service. Indeed, it can be argued that the numerousness of these statutes, contrasted with the utter lack of statutes imposing obligations on the States' executive (notwithstanding the attractiveness of that course to Congress), suggests an assumed absence of such power. . . . To complete the historical record, we must note that there is not only an absence of executive commandeering statutes in the early Congress, but there is an absence of them in our later history as well, at least until very recent years.

unknown

Source: U.S. Supreme Court, 1997, Printz v. United States

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bumper Sticker Wisdom on good ideas, laws, and speed of light

It's not just a good idea, it's the law. 186,000 miles per second.

Bumper Sticker Wisdom

Source: Bumper Sticker

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content