laws

A Quote by Stephen L. Richards on achievement, alienation, authors, certainty, constitution, daughters, divinity, eternity, exercise, fatherhood, fighting, gifts, god, good, history, independence, laws, liberty, men, nobility, principles, slavery, sons,

I have read and heard a good many statements by eminent writers and speakers to the effect that our liberty of which we are justly proud is an achievement, and not a gift. In the sense that it had to be worked for, fought for, and preserved with vigilance these statements are true. But let it never be forgotten that our concept of liberty is a gift. No human is the author of that concept. Many great men have so recognized it as did Thomas Jefferson when he wrote the Declaration of Independence and declared that "men are endowed with certain inalienable rights." Why are these rights inalienable? Because men did not create the right to liberty! In the exercise of his free agency he may surrender his privileges, and his property, and he may become the slave of others or of the state, but his free agency is as native to him as the air he breathes. It is part and parcel of his eternal constitution, and Jefferson was "righter than I think he himself knew" when he declared it an endowment which cannot be alienated. The message which we bear affirms that God is the Author of our inalienable liberty; that men, all men are of noble lineage, sons and daughters of the Eternal Father; and that liberty is their birthright. I thank God that . . . noble men were blessed with this lofty concept of man's inherent right to liberty and that they were prompted to incorporate these divine principles in the organic law and history of our favored land.

Stephen L. Richards (1879 - 1959)

Source: Ensign, November 1947.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen William Hawking on laws, nature, and optimism

There are grounds for cautious optimism that we may now be near the end of the search for the ultimate laws of nature.

Stephen Hawking (1942 -)

Source: A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes, Bantam, NY, 1988, p 157.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stanislaw Jerszy Lec on laws, people, and rules

Where a harsh law rules, people yearn for lawlessness.

Stanislaw Lec (1909 - 1966)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by St. George Tucker on army, colors, defense, destruction, government, laws, liberty, limits, nature, people, and study

In the appendix to the Commentaries, Tucker elaborates: This may be considered as the true palladium of liberty. . . . The right of self-defense is the first law of nature; in most governments it has been the study of rulers to confine this right within the narrowest limits possible. Whenever standing armies are kept up, and the right of the people to keep and bear arms is, under any color or pretext whatsoever, prohibited, liberty, if not already annihilated, is on the brink of destruction.

St. George Tucker (1751 - 1827)

Source: St. George Tucker in Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England (1803)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by St. George Tucker on army, colors, defense, destruction, government, laws, liberty, limits, nature, people, and study

Of the Second Amendment: The right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed, and this without any qualification as to their condition or degree, as is the case in the British government. In the appendix to the Commentaries, Tucker elaborates further: This may be considered as the true palladium of liberty... The right of self-defense is the first law of nature; in most governments it has been the study of rulers to confine this right within the narrowest limits possible. Whenever standing armies are kept up, and the right of the people to keep and bear arms is, under any color or pretext whatsoever, prohibited, liberty, if not already annihilated, is on the brink of destruction.

St. George Tucker (1751 - 1827)

Source: St. George Tucker in Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England (1803)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Richard Francis Burton on laws and life

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Do what thy manhood bids thee do, from none but self expect applause: He noblest lives and noblest dies who makes and keeps his self-made laws.

Sir Richard Burton (1821 - 1890)

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A Quote by Sir Max Beerbohm on laws and nature

It seems to be a law of nature that no man ever is loth to sit for his portrait.

Sir Max Beerbohm (1872 - 1956)

Source: Quia Imperfectum

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Isaac Newton on authors, laws, mathematics, and nature

The latest authors, like the most ancient, strove to subordinate the phenomena of nature to the laws of mathematics.

Sir Isaac Newton (1642 - 1727)

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A Quote by Sir Francis Galton on anarchy, confusion, errors, imagination, laws, order, and serenity

I know of scarcely anything so apt to impress the imagination as the wonderful form of cosmic order expressed by the "Law of Frequency of Error." The law would have been personified by the Greeks and deified, if they had known of it. It reigns with serenity and in complete self-effacement, amidst the wildest confusion. The huger the mob, and the greater the apparent anarchy, the more perfect is its sway. It is the supreme law of Unreason. Whenever a large sample of chaotic elements are taken in hand and marshaled in the order of their magnitude, an unsuspected and most beautiful form of regularity proves to have been latent all along.

Sir Francis Galton (1822 - 1911)

Source: J. R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956. p. 1482.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington on control, laws, mind, nature, and success

It is one thing for the human mind to extract from the phenomena of nature the laws which it has itself put into them; it may be a far harder thing to extract laws over which it has no control. It is even possible that laws which have not their origin in the mind may be irrational, and we can never succeed in formulating them.

Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington (1882 - 1944)

Source: Space, Time and Gravitation. 1920.

Contributed by: Zaady

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