laughter

A Quote by e. e. cummings on laughter

The most wasted of all days is one without laughter.

e.e. cummings (1894 - 1962)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dr. Herbert Hichen on courage, existence, humor, laughter, needs, sense of humor, value, world, and zest

Gaiety that sweetens existence and makes it wholesome - a sense of humor, a zest of enjoyment - this is the accompaniment of courage which gives it a supreme value. Something of the high laughter of a Cyrano de Bergerac - the world needs it.

Dr. Herbert Hichen

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dorothy Oakley Rea on dance, day, familiarity, laughter, motherhood, and sons

Mother and small son walking along a sun-splashed street; Their shadows, hand in hand, dance swiftly at their feet. Her shadow straight and tall; his shadow small and round; They laugh at their likenesses traced there upon the ground. The summer suns pass quickly. They walk another day. Now, shadows move sedately down the familiar way. His shadow now the tall one, her shadow slight and bent, And as she walks she wonders where his little shadow went.

Dorothy Oakley Rea

Source: Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Theodore Seuss Geisel "Dr. Seuss" on fantasy, laughter, life, and nonsense

I like nonsense, it wakes up the brain cells. Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living, it's a way of looking at life through the wrong end of a telescope and that enables you to laugh at life's realities.

Dr. Seuss (1904 - 1991)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Gillespie Magee, Jr. on dance, earth, god, grace, laughter, mind, and silence

High Flight Oh! I have slipped the surly bonds of earth And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings; Sunward I've climbed, and joined the tumbling mirth Of sun-split clouds-and done a hundred things You have not dreamed of-wheeled and soared and swung High in the sunlit silence. Hov'ring there I've chased the shouting wind along, and flung My eager craft through footless halls of air. Up, up the long, delirious, burning blue I've topped the wind-swept heights with easy grace, Where never the lark, nor even eagle flew- And, while with silent lifting mind I've trod The high, untrespassed sanctity of space, Put out my hand and touched the face of God

Dizzy Gillespie (1922 - 1941)

Source: High Flight

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Gillespie Magee, Jr. on dance, earth, laughter, and silence

Oh! I have slipped the surly bonds of earth And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings; Sunward I've climbed, and joined the tumbling mirth Of sun-split clouds-and done a hundred things You have not dreamed of-wheeled and soared and swung High in the sunlit silence. Hov'ring there I've chased the shouting wind along, and flung My eager craft through footless halls of air.

Dizzy Gillespie (1922 - 1941)

Source: High Flight

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by David Hobson on good, health, laughter, and life

Yup, gardening and laughing are two of the best things in life you can do to promote good health and a sense of well being.

David Hobson

Source: The Mad Gardener

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Damon Runyon on laughter and order

She has a laugh so hearty it knocks the whipped cream off an order of strawberry shortcake on a table fifty feet away.

Damon Runyon

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Clement Clarke Moore on children, christmas, clothes, dance, day, giving, good, happiness, hope, justice, laughter, obstacles, vision, and work

'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse; The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there; The children were nestled all snug in their beds, While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads; And mamma in her 'kerchief, and I in my cap, Had just settled down for a long winter's nap, When out on the lawn there arose such a clatter, I sprang from the bed to see what was the matter. Away to the window I flew like a flash, Tore open the shutters and threw up the sash. The moon on the breast of the new-fallen snow Gave the lustre of mid-day to objects below, When, what to my wondering eyes should appear, But a miniature sleigh, and eight tiny reindeer, With a little old driver, so lively and quick, I knew in a moment it must be St. Nick. More rapid than eagles his coursers they came, And he whistled, and shouted, and called them by name; "Now, DASHER! now, DANCER! now, PRANCER and VIXEN! On, COMET! on CUPID! on, DONNER and BLITZEN! To the top of the porch! to the top of the wall! Now dash away! dash away! dash away all!" As dry leaves that before the wild hurricane fly, When they meet with an obstacle, mount to the sky, So up to the house-top the coursers they flew, With the sleigh full of toys, and St. Nicholas too. And then, in a twinkling, I heard on the roof The prancing and pawing of each little hoof. As I drew in my hand, and was turning around, Down the chimney St. Nicholas came with a bound. He was dressed all in fur, from his head to his foot, And his clothes were all tarnished with ashes and soot; A bundle of toys he had flung on his back, And he looked like a peddler just opening his pack. His eyes - how they twinkled! his dimples how merry! His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry! His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow, And the beard of his chin was as white as the snow; The stump of a pipe he held tight in his teeth, And the smoke it encircled his head like a wreath; He had a broad face and a little round belly, That shook, when he laughed like a bowlful of jelly. He was chubby and plump, a right jolly old elf, And I laughed when I saw him, in spite of myself; A wink of his eye and a twist of his head, Soon gave me to know I had nothing to dread; He spoke not a word, but went straight to his work, And filled all the stockings; then turned with a jerk, And laying his finger aside of his nose, And giving a nod, up the chimney he rose; He sprang to his sleigh, to his team gave a whistle, And away they all flew like the down of a thistle. But I heard him exclaim, ere he drove out of sight, "HAPPY CHRISTMAS TO ALL, AND TO ALL A GOOD-NIGHT!"

Clement Clarke Moore (1779 - 1863)

Source: A Visit from St. Nicholas.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Claude Roy on existence, humor, laughter, love, misfortune, and attachment

Love is an attachment to another self. Humor is a form of self-detachment - a way of looking at one's existence, one's misfortune, or one's discomfort. If you really love, if you really know how to laugh, the result is the same: you forget yourself.

Claude Roy

Contributed by: Zaady

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