laughter

A Quote by Gaius Valerius Catullus on foolishness and laughter

There is nothing more foolish than a foolish laugh. Risu inepto res ineptior nulla est

Gaius Valerius Catullus (c. 84 - 54 BC)

Source: Written in the time of Julius Cæsar.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by G. S. Merriam on humor, laughter, life, and sense of humor

The sense of humor is the oil of life's engine. Without it, the machinery creaks and groans. No lot is so hard, no aspect of things is so grim, but it relaxes before a hearty laugh.

G. S. Merriam

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky on good, ideas, justice, laughter, nobility, silence, soul, and wishes

If you wish to glimpse inside a human soul and get to know a man, don't bother analyzing his ways of being silent, of talking, of weeping, or seeing how much he is moved by noble ideas; you'll get better results if you just watch him laugh. If he laughs well, he's a good man.

Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821 - 1881)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche on dance, day, laughter, losing, and truth

And we should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at least once. And we should call every truth false which was not accompanied by at least one laugh.

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844 - 1900)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche on laughter and suffering

Perhaps I know best why it is man alone who laughs; he alone suffers so deeply that he had to invent laughter.

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844 - 1900)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frank Tebbets on death, laughter, life, and love

A life without love in it is like a heap of ashes upon a deserted hearth, with the fire dead, the laughter stilled and the light extinguished.

Frank Tebbets

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by F. Burton Howard on anger, apologies, automobiles, certainty, choice, christmas, cities, clarity, college, confusion, day, decisions, driving, family, fatherhood, good, history, home, jokes, journeys, kiss, laughter, life, losing, mountains, n

When I was in my first year of college at Logan, Utah, I bought an old car for a hundred dollars. I was eighteen and thought that I knew all about driving. It was Christmastime, and my parents were living on a ranch in Wyoming. I picked up my two grandmothers and took them to my parents' home for Christmas. We had a grand time there. When it was time to return to school, the weather had changed and the roads were treacherous. That morning as we were ready to leave, we held a family prayer in the living room. My father prayed that we would have a safe journey. After we had loaded my car with suitcases, blankets, tuna fish sandwiches, and a thermos bottle full of Postum, Dad walked out to the car and said, 'I want to talk to you.' We went over and stood by the fence. 'You have a very valuable cargo,' he said, nodding at my grandmothers. 'I want you to promise me that if the roads are bad and it's snowing when you get down to Lander, you won't go over South Pass. I want you to take the long way.' I promised him that I would. My parents kissed us good-bye, and we were on our way. We had nice weather until we got to Riverton; then it started to snow. By the time we got to Lander, it was snowing pretty hard. I remembered my promise, so when we came to the intersection where you turn to go up the mountain, I made a conscious turn to go the long way. I remember thinking then that it was going to take us five hours longer to get to Utah. I knew the road, and I was absolutely certain that I had made the right turn. As we drove along, we were joking and laughing, although the snow was getting thicker. Then I saw a sign that read, 'Historic Old South Pass City,' and I realized that I had somehow become confused in the snowstorm and had taken the wrong road! I thought, Dad will be angry with me! I don't know how this happened-it wasn't intentional. I had only two choices: I could keep on going, or I could turn around and go back. By this time, we were at the summit, so I decided that we might as well keep going and that I would apologize to Dad later. As we came down the mountain, the snow stopped and the roads were clear. We drove to Logan and then to Malad without any problems. On my way to school the next day I happened to see the front-page headline of a newspaper: WORST BLIZZARD OF THE YEAR STRANDS HUNDREDS IN CENTRAL WYOMING. I bought a paper, and it was full of stories about people who had been stranded, lost, or killed on the road that I had promised to take. I realized that the prayer our family had offered had been answered. I knew that the Lord had gotten us on the right road, and I realized how He had protected us. I was never the same after that.

F. Burton Howard (1933 -)

Source: © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ezra Pound on death and laughter

hysterias, trench confessions, laughter out of dead bellies.

Ezra Pound (1885 - 1972)

Source: Hugh Selwyn Mauberley. E.P. Ode pour l’élection de son sepulchre, 1920,

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ethel Barrymore on day and laughter

You grow up the day you have your first real laugh - at yourself.

Ethel Barrymore (1879 - 1959)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Erma Bombeck on happiness, laughter, marriage, needs, and people

What makes people laugh? . . . It's a happy marriage between a person who needs to laugh and someone who's got one to give.

Erma Bombeck (1927 - 1996)

Contributed by: Zaady

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