krishnamurti

A Quote by Krishnamurthi on krishnamurti

Live every day like it is your last day on earth

Krishnamurthi

Source: "Krishnamurti"

Contributed by: starpeople

A Quote by U.G. Krishnamurti on u g, krishnamurti, understanding, life, self, search, realization, enlightenment, freedom, ego, and meditation

The search ends with the realization that there is no such thing as enlightenment. By searching, you want to be free from the self, but whatever you are doing to free yourself from the self is the self. How can I make you understand this simple thing? There is no 'how'. If I tell you that, it will only add more momentum to that (search), strengthen that momentum. That is the question of all questions: "How, how, how?"

U.G. Krishnamurti

Source: The Mystique of Enlightenment

Contributed by: Nalini

A Quote by U.G. Krishnamurti on u g, krishnamurti, understanding, question, search, realization, and language

You know, this dialogue is only helpful when we come, both of us, to a point and realize that no dialogue is possible, that no dialogue is necessary. When I say 'understanding', 'seeing', they mean something different to me. Understanding is a state of being where the question isn't there any more; there is nothing there that says "now I understand!" -- that's the basic difficulty between us. By understanding what I am saying, you are not going to get anywhere.

U.G. Krishnamurti

Source: The Mystique of Enlightenment

Contributed by: Nalini

A Quote by U.G. Krishnamurti on u g, krishnamurti, understanding, questions, search, realization, language, seeker, and answers

The questioner has to come to an end.  It is the questioner that creates the answer; and the questioner comes into being from the answer, otherwise there is no questioner.

U.G. Krishnamurti

Source: The Mystique of Enlightenment

Contributed by: Nalini

A Quote by U.G. Krishnamurti on u g, krishnamurti, understanding, life, death, soul, knowledge, questions, and answers

You have no way of knowing anything about your death, now or at the end of your so-called life.  Unless knowledge, the continuity of knowledge, comes to an end, death cannot take place.  You want to know something about death: you want to make that a part of your knowledge.  But death is not something mysterious; the ending of that knowledge is death.  What do you think will continue after death?  What is there while you are living?  Where is the entity there?  There is nothing there -- no soul -- there is only this question about after death.  The question has to die now to find the answer -- your answer; not my answer -- because the question is born out of the assumption, the belief, that there is something to continue after death.

U.G. Krishnamurti

Source: The Mystique of Enlightenment

Contributed by: Nalini

A Quote by J. (Jiddu) Krishnamurti on meditation, krishnamurti, and love

After the rains the hills were splendid. They were still brown from the summer sun, and now all the green things would come out. It had rained quite heavily, and the beauty of those hills was indescribable. The sky was still clouded and in the air there was the smell of sumac, sage and eucalyptus. It was splendid to be among them, and a strange stillness possessed you. Unlike the sea which lay far down below you, those hills were completely still. As you watched and looked about you, you had left everything down below in that little house your clothes, your thoughts and the odd ways of life. Here you were travelling very lightly, without any thoughts, without any burden, and with a feeling of complete emptiness and beauty. The little green bushes would soon be still greener, and in a few weeks' time they would have a stronger smell. The quails were calling and a few of them flew over. Without knowing it, the mind was in a state of meditation in which love was flowering. After all, only in the soil of meditation can this flower bloom. It was really quite marvellous, and strangely, all through the night it pursued you, and when you woke, long before the sun was up, it was still there in your heart with its incredible joy, for no reason whatsoever. It was there, causeless, and was quite intoxicating. It would be there all through the day without your ever asking or inviting it to stay with you.

J. Krishnamurti (1895 - 1986)

Source: Meditations 1969 Part 6

Contributed by: basho

A Quote by J. (Jiddu) Krishnamurti on meditation and krishnamurti

It had rained heavily during the night and the day, and down the gullies the muddy stream poured into the sea, making it chocolate-brown. As you walked on the beach the waves were enormous and they were breaking with magnificent curve and force. You walked against the wind, and suddenly you felt there was nothing between you and the sky, and this openness was heaven. To be so completely open, vulnerable to the hills, to the sea and to man is the very essence of meditation. To have no resistance, to have no barriers inwardly towards anything, to be really free, completely, from all the minor urges, compulsions and demands, with all their little conflicts and hypocrisies, is to walk in life with open arms. And that evening, walking there on that wet sand, with the seagulls around you, you felt the extraordinary sense of open freedom and the great beauty of love which was not in you or outside you but everywhere. We don't realize how important it is to be free of the nagging pleasures and their pains, so that the mind remains alone. It is only the mind that is wholly alone that is open. You felt all this suddenly, like a great wind that swept over the land and through you. There you were denuded of everything, empty and therefore utterly open. The beauty of it was not in the word or in the feeling, but seemed to be everywhere about you, inside you, over the waters and in the hills. Meditation is this.

J. Krishnamurti (1895 - 1986)

Source: Meditations 1969 Part 7

Contributed by: basho

A Quote by J. (Jiddu) Krishnamurti on meditation, krishnamurti, mind, meditative, and love

Meditation is one of the most extraordinary things, and if you do not know what it is you are like the blind man in a world of bright colour, shadows and moving light. It is not an intellectual affair, but when the heart enters into the mind, the mind has quite a different quality: it is really, then, limitless, not only in its capacity to think, to act efficiently, but also in its sense of living in a vast space where you are part of everything.

Meditation is the movement of love. It isn't the love of the one or of the many. It is like water that anyone can drink out of any jar, whether golden or earthenware: it is inexhaustible. And a peculiar thing takes place which no drug or self-hypnosis can bring about: it is as though the mind enters into itself, beginning at the surface and penetrating ever more deeply, until depth and height have lost their meaning and every form of measurement ceases. In this state there is complete peace not contentment which has come about through gratification but a peace that has order, beauty and intensity. It can all be destroyed, as you can destroy a flower, and yet because of its very vulnerability it is indestructible. This meditation cannot be learned from another. You must begin without knowing anything about it, and move from innocence to innocence.

The soil in which the meditative mind can begin is the soil of everyday life, the strife, the pain, and the fleeting joy. It must begin there, and bring order, and from there move endlessly. But if you are concerned only with making order, then that very order will bring about its own limitation, and the mind will be its prisoner. In all this movement you must somehow begin from the other end, from the other shore, and not always be concerned with this shore or how to cross the river. You must take a plunge into the water, not knowing how to swim. And the beauty of meditation is that you never know where you are, where you are going, what the end is.

J. Krishnamurti (1895 - 1986)

Source: Meditations 1969 Part 4

Contributed by: basho

A Quote by J. (Jiddu) Krishnamurti on meditation, krishnamurti, mind, silence, and action

When you turn your head from horizon to horizon your eyes see a vast space in which all the things of the earth and of the sky appear. But this space is always limited where the earth meets the sky. The space in the mind is so small. In this little space all our activities seem to take place: the daily living and the hidden struggles with contradictory desires and motives. In this little space the mind seeks freedom, and so it is always a prisoner of itself. Meditation is the ending of this little space. To us, action is bringing about order in this little space of the mind. But there is another action which is not putting order in this little space. Meditation is action which comes when the mind has lost its little space. This vast space which the mind, the I, cannot reach, is silence. The mind can never be silent within itself; it is silent only within the vast space which thought cannot touch. Out of this silence there is action which is not of thought. Meditation is this silence.

J. Krishnamurti (1895 - 1986)

Source: Meditations 1969 Part 3

Contributed by: basho

A Quote by J. (Jiddu) Krishnamurti on meditation, krishnamurti, experience, visions, perception, realization, recognition, memory, search, and mind

Is there a new experience in meditation? The desire for experience, the higher experience which is beyond and above the daily or the commonplace, is what keeps the well-spring empty. The craving for more experience, for visions, for higher perception, for some realization or other, makes the mind look outward, which is no different from its dependence on environment and people. The curious part of meditation is that an event is not made into an experience. It is there, like a new star in the heavens, without memory taking it over and holding it, without the habitual process of recognition and response in terms of like and dislike. Our search is always outgoing; the mind seeking any experience is outgoing. Inward-going is not a search at all; it is perceiving. Response is always repetitive, for it comes always from the same bank of memory.

J. Krishnamurti (1895 - 1986)

Source: Meditations 1969 Part 5

Contributed by: basho

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