knowledge

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on emptiness, knowledge, limits, mind, and taoism

The mind remains undetermined in the great Void. Here the highest knowledge is unbounded. That which gives things their thusness cannot be delimited by things. So when we speak of 'limits', we remain confined to limited things. The limit of the unlimited is called 'fullness.' The limitlessness of the limited is called 'emptiness.' Tao is the source of both. But it is itself neither fullness nor emptiness.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 22:6, pp. 182-183

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on knowledge

Great knowledge sees all in one. Small knowledge breaks down into the many.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (2:2, p. 55)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Christopher McDowell on cosmology, culture, divinity, earth, knowledge, prophets, and sacred

Among archetypal images, the Sacred Tree is one of the most widely known symbols on Earth. There are few cultures in which the Sacred Tree does not figure: as an image of the cosmos, as a dwelling place of gods or spirits, as a medium of prophecy and knowledge, and as an agent of metamorphoses when the tree is transformed into human or divine form or when it bears a divine or human image as its fruit or flowers.

Christopher McDowell

Source: Sanctuary Garden: Creating A Place Of Refuge In Your Yard Or Garden, 1998, p 128

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Morgan on knowledge and wonder

As knowledge increases, wonder deepens.

Charles Morgan (1795 - 1878)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Haddon Spurgeon on knowledge, men, and wisdom

Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise. Many men know a great deal, and are all the greater fools for it. There is no fool so great a fool as a knowing fool. But to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom.

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (1834 - 1892)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Robert Darwin on confidence, ignorance, knowledge, problems, and science

Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge; it is those who know little, and not those who know much, who so positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science.

Charles Darwin (1809 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles A. Lindbergh, Jr. on animals, challenge, civilization, clarity, discovery, knowledge, life, men, plants, progress, quality, and science

Is civilization progress? The challenge, I think, is clear; and, as clearly, the final answer will be given not by our amassing of knowledge, or by the discoveries of our science, or by the speed of our aircraft, but by the effect of our civilized activities as a whole have upon the quality of our planet's life-the life of plants and animals as that of men.

Charles Lindbergh (1902 - 1974)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Carl Gustav Jung on errors, knowledge, and truth

Knowledge rests not upon truth alone, but upon error also.

Carl Jung (1875 - 1961)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Carl Gustav Jung on knowledge, mistakes, and truth

Mistakes are, after all, the foundations of truth, and if a man does not know what a thing is, it is at least an increase in knowledge if he knows what it is not.

Carl Jung (1875 - 1961)

Source: Aion (1951)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by C. E. M. Joad on acting, faith, familiarity, ignorance, knowledge, paradox, reason, religion, rest, trust, truth, understanding, universe, and words

Intellect can light up only a small area of the universe. For my part, I should subscribe to the familiar paradox that the more we know, the more we are conscious of our ignorance - the further the intellect has traveled, the smaller it seems relatively to the distance still to be traveled... The intellect does, indeed, take us part of the way; we have no other mode of conveyance; and, in taking us as far as it does, it justifies us in taking the rest on trust... In following the religious account of the universe beyond the point at which it leaves reason behind, and trusting to it as an explanation of the many things that pass our understanding, we are accepting on faith conclusions which are not demonstrated by reason. In other words, we are acting as if a hypothesis were true, which, at the moment, at which we act upon it, is still a hypothesis and not a truth. Nevertheless, it is, I suggest, knowledge, the knowledge which we possess already and which reason has won for us, that makes it reasonable to do so.

C. E. M. Joad

Source: The Recovery of Belief

Contributed by: Zaady

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