justice

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on confidence, country, exercise, existence, government, hope, justice, patience, people, and world

This country, with its institutions, belongs to the people who inhabit it. Whenever they shall grow weary of the existing government, they can exercise their constitutional right of amending it, or their revolutionary right to dismember or overthrow it. Why should there not be a patient confidence in the ultimate justice of the people? Is there any better or equal hope in the world?

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: 1861

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on action, charity, community, government, individuality, justice, men, nature, needs, people, schools, separation, and variety

The legitimate object of government is to do for a community of people whatever they need to have done, but cannot do at all in their separate and individual capacities. In all that the people can individually do as well for themselves, government ought not to interfere. The desirable things which the individuals of a people can not do, or can not well do, for themselves, fall into two classes: those which have relation to wrongs, and those which have not. Each of these branch off into an infinite variety of subdivisions. The first - that in relation to wrongs - embraces all crimes, misdemeanors, and nonperformance of contracts. The other embraces all which, in its nature, and without wrong, requires combined action, as public roads and highways, public schools, charities, pauperism, orphanage, estates of the deceased, and the machinery of government itself. From this it appears that if all men were just, there still would be some, though not so much, need for government.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: fragment on government (July 1, 1854?)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on achievement, authors, charity, god, justice, nations, peace, and work

With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow and his orphan - to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace, among ourselves, and with all nations. "Both the Gettysburg address and the Second Inaugural Address mark the height of Lincoln's eloquence. The London Times called the latter the most sublime state paper of the century. Exactly two months later it was read over its author's grave." - Complete Works of Abraham Lincoln, new and enl. ed., ed. John G. Nicolay and John Hay, vol. 9, p. 44, footnote (1905). An excerpt appears on a plaque on the Veterans Administration building in Washington, D.C.: "To care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow, and his orphan."

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Second Inaugural Address, Mar. 4, 1865

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on confidence, hope, justice, patience, people, and world

Why should there not be a patient confidence in the ultimate justice of the people? Is there any better or equal hope in the world?

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on agreement, confusion, country, justice, and time

The story of a jackass Lincoln owned as a young man: The case of that jackass was most singular. When everything was pleasant all around he would kick the worst. When his rack was fullest and his stall fixed with new straw and everything real comfortable, that jackass would start in on the almightiest spell of kicking that was ever seen. All the veterinary surgeons in the neighborhood came and tried to find out just what made the critter kick so. They never could agree about it. One thing we all noticed was that he always brayed and kicked at the same time. Sometimes he would bray first and then kick, but other times he would kick first and then bray, so that confused us, and nobody in that whole country was ever able to find out whether that jackass was braying at his own kick or kicking at his own brays.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Campaign for Congress, Sangamon, Illinois, 1854

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on earth, failure, freedom, generosity, giving, god, honor, hope, justice, peace, slavery, success, and world

In giving freedom to the slave, we assure freedom to the free - honorable alike in what we give, and what we preserve. We shall nobly save, or meanly lose, the last best hope of earth. Other means may succeed; this could not fail. The way is plain, peaceful, generous, just - a way which, if followed, the world will forever applaud, and God must forever bless.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Second Annual Message to Congress, Dec. 1, 1862.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on freedom, god, justice, slavery, and world

This is a world of compensation; and he who would be no slave must consent to have no slave. Those who deny freedom to others, deserve it not for themselves; and, under a just God, can not long retain it.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Letter To Henry L. Pierce and Others, April 6, 1859

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on belief, justice, struggle, and support

The probability that we may fall in the struggle ought not to deter us from the support of a cause we believe to be just; it shall not deter me.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Speech on the Sub-Treasury, in the Illinois House of Representatives, December 26, 1839

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on america, art, compliments, creation, god, justice, poets, praise, study, war, women, and world

Remarks at Closing of Sanitary Fair, Washington D.C., March 18, 1864. I have never studied the art of paying compliments to women; but I must say that if all that has been said by orators and poets since the creation of the world in praise of women were applied to the women of America, it would not do them justice for their conduct during this war. I will close by saying, God bless the women of America!

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln edited by Roy P. Basler, Volume VII, ", p. 254.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on conflict, expectation, god, judgment, justice, men, purpose, and war

Neither party expected for the war, the magnitude, or the duration, which it has already attained. Neither anticipated that the cause of the conflict might cease with, or even before, the conflict itself should cease. Each looked for an easier triumph, and a result less fundamental and astounding. Both read the same Bible, and pray to the same God; and each invokes His aid against the other. It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God's assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men's faces; but let us judge not, that we be not judged. The prayers of both could not be answered; that of neither has been answered fully. The Almighty has His own purposes.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1865.

Contributed by: Zaady

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