justice

A Quote by Aeschylus on justice and time

Justice, voiceless, unseen, seeth thee when thou sleepest and when thou goest forth and when thou liest down. Continually doth she attend thee, now aslant thy course, now at a later time. These lines are from a section of doubtful or spurious fragments.

Aeschylus (525 - 456 BC)

Source: translated by Herbert W Smyth, vol. 2, p. 513 (1926).

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Adelaide Crapsey on dawn, death, justice, and silence

These beThree silent things: The Falling snow. . . the hour Before the dawn. . . the mouth of one Just dead. 

Adelaide Crapsey (1878 - 1914)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Adam Smith on competition, interest, justice, laws, men, and order

Every man, as long as he does not violate the laws of justice, is left perfectly free to pursue his own interest his own way, and to bring both his industry and capital into competition with those of any other man or order of men.

Adam Smith

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on adaptability, god, justice, purpose, present, time, and war

The will of God prevails. In great contests each party claims to act in accordance with the will of God. Both may be, and one must be, wrong. God cannot be for and against the same thing at the same time. In the present civil war it is quite possible that God's purpose is something different from the purpose of either party - and yet the human instrumentalities, working just as they do, are of the best adaptation to effect His purpose.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Meditation on the Divine Will, September 2, 1862

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on good, justice, labor, liberty, men, names, people, tyranny, and world

The world has never had a good definition of the word liberty, and the American people, just now, are much in want of one. We all declare for liberty; but in using the same word we do not all mean the same thing. With some the word liberty may mean for each man to do as he pleases with himself, and the product of his labor; while with others the same word may mean for some men to do as they please with other men, and the product of other men's labor. Here are two, not only different, but incompatible things, called by the same name - liberty. And it follows that each of the things is, by the respective parties, called by two different and incompatible names - liberty and tyranny.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: address at sanitary fair, Baltimore, Maryland, April 18, 1864

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on government, justice, men, and needs

If all men were just, there still would be some, though not so much, need of government.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on happiness, justice, and people

People are just about as happy as they make up their minds to be.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on hell, ideas, and justice

I had been told I was on the road to hell, but I had no idea it was just a mile down the road with a dome on it.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on encouragement, good, justice, labor, violence, and world

Property is the fruit of labor . . . property is desirable . . . is a positive good in the world. That some should be rich shows that others may become rich, and hence is just encouragement to industry and enterprise. Let not him who is houseless pull down the house of another; but let him labor diligently and build one for himself, thus by example assuring that his own shall be safe from violence when built.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Reply to New York Workingmen's Democratic Republican Association, March 21, 1864

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on encouragement, good, justice, labor, violence, war, and world

Nor should this lead us to a war upon property, or the owners of property. Property is the fruit of labor; property is desirable; is a positive good in the world. That some should be rich shows that others may become rich and, hence, is just encouragement to industry and enterprise. Let not him who is houseless pull down the house of another, but let him labor diligently and build one for himself, thus, by example, assuring that his own shall be safe from violence when built.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

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