journeys

A Quote by T. Laurence Seibert on farewells and journeys

Casey Jones! Orders in his hand. Casey Jones! Mounted to the cabin Took his farewell journey to that promised land.

T. Laurence Seibert

Source: Casey Jones, 1909. Adapted from verses by Wallace Saunders, set to music by Eddie Newton

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen Joshua Sondheim on journeys, learning, and time

Into the woods you go again You have to every now and then Into the woods, no telling when Be ready for the journey Into the woods, each time you go There's more to learn of what you know.

Stephen Joshua Sondheim (1930 -)

Source: Into The Woods

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sogyal Rinpoche on body, buddhism, compassion, direction, ignorance, journeys, kindness, life, magic, miracles, nature, practice, teachers, time, truth, trying, understanding, wisdom, work, and world

Our buddha nature, then, has an active aspect, which is our "inner teacher." From the very moment we became obscured, this inner teacher has been working tirelessly for us, tirelessly trying to bring us back to the radiance and spaciousness of our true being. . . . When we have prayed and aspired and hungered for the truth for a long time, for many, many lives, and when our karma has become sufficiently purified, a kind of miracle takes place. And this miracle, if we can understand and use it, can lead to the end of ignorance forever: The inner teacher, who has been with us always, manifests in the form of the "outer teacher," whom, almost as if by magic, we actually encounter. . . . He or she is nothing less than the human face of the absolute. . . , the crystallization of the wisdom of all the buddhas, and the embodiment of their compassion directed always toward you. . . . . . . For me, my masters have been the embodiment of living truth, undeniable signs that enlightenment is possible in a body, in this life, in this world, even here and even now, the supreme inspirations in my practice, in my work, in my life, and in my journey toward liberation. . . .

Sogyal Rinpoche

Source: Sogyal Rinpoche in The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, HarperCollins Publishers, 1993, p. 134

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Socrates on courage, good, journeys, justice, nobility, soul, and truth

And I say let a man be of good cheer about his soul. When the soul has been arrayed in her own proper jewels - temperance and justice, and courage, and nobility and truth - she is ready to go on her journey when the hour comes.

Socrates (469 - 399 BC)

Source: (Minutes before his execution)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shaftesbury on good, journeys, prejudice, and world

Prejudice is a mist, which in our journey through the world often dims the brightest and obscures the best of all the good and glorious objects that meet us on our way.

Shaftesbury

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Smiles on hope and journeys

Hope is like the sun, which, as we journey toward it, casts the shadow of our burden behind us.

Samuel Smiles (1812 - 1904)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Saint Teresa of Avila on feeling, god, and journeys

The feeling remains that God is on the journey, too.

Saint Teresa of Avila (1515 - 1582)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Saint Clement of Alexandria on acceptance, age, beginning, belief, brothers, certainty, character, christ, church, cities, companions, cooperation, corruption, crime, death, departure, divinity, elderly, evil, familiarity, fatherhood, fear, fo

An apocryphal story from the writings of Clement of Alexandria regarding John the Apostle quoted by John H. Vandenberg, Conference Report, October 1963, p.45 - p.46: ". . . about John the Apostle, handed down and preserved in memory. When, on the death of the tyrant, he (John) passed over to Ephesus from the Island of Patmos, he used to make missionary journeys also to neighboring gentile cities, in some places to appoint bishops, and in some to set in order whole churches and . . . to appoint one of those indicated by the Spirit. On his arrival then at one of the cities at no great distance, of which some even mention the name, . . . he saw a youth of stalwart frame and winning countenance, and impetuous spirit, and said to the bishop, 'I entrust to thee this youth with all earnestness, calling Christ and the Church to witness.' The bishop accepted the trust, and made all the requisite promises, and the apostle renewed his injunction and adjuration. He then returned to Ephesus, and the elder taking home with him the youth who had been entrusted to his care, maintained, cherished, and finally baptized him. After this he abandoned further care and protection of him, considering that he had affixed to him the seal of the Lord as a perfect amulet against evil. Thus prematurely neglected, the youth was corrupted by certain idle companions of his own age, who were familiar with evil, and who first led him astray by many costly banquets, and then took him out by night with them to share in their felonious proceedings, finally demanding his cooperation in some worse crime. First familiarized with guilt, and then, from the force of his character, starting aside from the straight path like some mighty steed that seizes the bit between its teeth; he rushed towards headlong ruin, and utterly abandoning the divine salvation, gathered his worst comrades around him, and became a most violent, bloodstained, and reckless bandit-chief. Not long afterwards John was recalled to the city, and after putting other things in order said, 'Come now, O bishop, restore to me the deposit which I and the Saviour entrusted to thee, with the witness of the Church over which thou dost preside.' At first the bishop in his alarm mistook the meaning of the metaphor, but the apostle said, 'I demand back the young man and the soul of the brother.' Then groaning from the depth of his heart and shedding tears, 'He is dead,' said the bishop. 'How and by what death?' 'He is dead to God! For he has turned out wicked and desperate, and, to sum up all, a brigand; and now, instead of the Church he has seized the mountain, with followers like himself.' Then the apostle, rending his robe and beating his head, with loud wailing said, 'A fine guardian of our brother's soul did I leave! Give me a horse and a guide.' Instantly, . . . he rode away . . . from the Church and arriving at the brigands' outposts, was captured without flight or resistance, but crying, 'For this I have come. Lead me to your chief.' The chief awaited him in his armour, but when he recognized John as he approached, he was struck with shame and turned to fly [flight]. But John pursued him as fast as he could, forgetful of his age, crying out, 'Why my son, dost thou fly [flee] from thine own father, unarmed, aged as he is? Pity me, . . . fear not . . . stay! believe! Christ sent me.' But he on hearing these words first stood with downcast gaze, then flung away his arms, then trembling, began to weep bitterly, and embraced the old man when he came up to him, pleading with his groans, . . . but the apostle pledging himself . . . led him back to the Church and praying for him . . . and wrestling with him in earnest fastings . . . did not depart, as they say, till he restored him to the bosom of the Church."

Saint Clement of Alexandria (c.150 - c.220)

Source: St. Clement of Alexandria, Quis Divinitus Salv., chapter 42.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert R. Updegraff on day, facts, good, happiness, journeys, life, success, and trouble

Someone has well said, " Success is a journey, not a destination." Happiness is to be found along the way, not at the end of the road, for then the journey is over and it is too late. Today, this hour, this minute is the day, the hour, the minute for each of us to sense the fact that life is good, with all of its trials and troubles, and perhaps more interesting because of them.

Robert R. Updegraff

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert J. Kleinhenz on automobiles, beginning, camping, journeys, mountains, obstacles, struggle, and trying

When asked what it was like to set about proving something, the mathematician likened proving a theorem to seeing the peak of a mountain and trying to climb to the top. One establishes a base camp and begins scaling the mountain's sheer face, encountering obstacles at every turn, often retracing one's steps and struggling every foot of the journey. Finally when the top is reached, one stands examining the peak, taking in the view of the surrounding countrysideand then noting the automobile road up the other side!

Robert J. Kleinhenz

Contributed by: Zaady

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