internet

A Quote by Jimmy Carter on globalization, poverty, internet, truth, and jimmy carter

“Globalization, as defined by rich people like us, is a very nice thing... you are talking about the Internet, you are talking about cell phones, you are talking about computers. This doesn't affect two-thirds of the people of the world.”

Jimmy Carter (1924 -)

Source: Thinkexist.com

Contributed by: Zoe

A Quote by Christopher Locke on internet and ipo

A few years ago you could make an interesting distinction who thought there was something special about the Internet and those who saw it as no big deal. Now of course everybody sees it as a big deal mostly because of those weirdball IPOs and the overnight billionnaires they spawned. But I think the distinction is still valid. Most companies with Net-dollar-signs in their eyes today are still missing the "something special" dimension.

Christopher Locke

Source: The Cluetrain Manifesto: The End of Business as Usual, Pages: 6

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Tim Berners-Lee on enquire, web, and internet

When I first began tinkering with a software program that eventually gave rise to the idea of the World Wide Web, I named it Enquire, short for Enquire Within upon Everything, a musty old book of Victorian advice I noticed as a child in my parent's house outside London. With its title suggestive of magic, the book served as a portal to a world of information, everything from how to remove clothing stains to tips on investing money. Not a perfect analogy for the Web, but a primitive starting point.

Tim Berners-Lee

Source: Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web, Pages: 1

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by U.S. Supreme Court on agreement, community, internet, and speech

We agree with the District Court's conclusion that the [Communications Decency Act] places an unacceptably heavy burden on protected speech... In Sable [v. FCC] we remarked that the speech restriction at issue there amounted to "burning the house to roast the pig." The CDA, casting a far darker shadow over free speech, threatens to torch a large segment of the Internet community.

U.S. Supreme Court

Source: 1997, Janet Reno et al. v. ACLU et al. [Interior clarifications omitted]

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by U.S. Supreme Court on birth, children, college, community, computers, contentment, control, family, government, home, information, internet, judgment, parenthood, speech, and thought

Under the [Communications Decency Act], a parent allowing her 17 year old to use the family computer to obtain information on the Internet that she, in her parental judgment, deems appropriate could face a lengthy prison term. . . . Similarly, a parent who sent his 17 year old college freshman information on birth control via e mail could be incarcerated even though neither he, his child, nor anyone in their home community, found the material "indecent" or "patently offensive," if the college town's community thought otherwise. The breadth of this content based restriction of speech imposes an especially heavy burden on the Government to explain why a less restrictive provision would not be as effective as the CDA. It has not done so.

U.S. Supreme Court

Source: 1997 Janet Reno et al. v. ACLU et al.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by U.S. Supreme Court on books, certainty, exercise, government, internet, liberty, opportunity, speech, and world

The Government first contends that, even though the [Communications Decency Act] effectively censors discourse on many of the Internet's modalities - such as chat groups, newsgroups, and mail exploders - it is nonetheless constitutional because it provides a "reasonable opportunity" for speakers to engage in the restricted speech on the World Wide Web.... The Government's position is equivalent to arguing that a statute could ban leaflets on certain subjects as long as individuals are free to publish books.... One is not to have the exercise of his liberty of expression in appropriate places abridged on the plea that it may be exercised in some other place.

U.S. Supreme Court

Source: 1997, Janet Reno et al. v. ACLU et al. [Interior quotes and citations omitted]

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on dogs and internet

On the internet, nobody knows you're a dog.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Judge Stewart Dalzell on internet and speech

The Internet is a far more speech-enhancing medium than print, the village green, or the mails. Because it would necessarily affect the Internet itself, the [Communications Decency Act] would necessarily reduce the speech available for adults on the medium. This is a constitutionally intolerable result.

Stewart Dalzell

Source: 1996, ACLU, et al., v. Janet Reno, 96-963 and ALA, et al., v. Dept. of Justice, 96-1458

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Judge Stewart Dalzell on absence, achievement, chaos, contentment, internet, justice, kindness, liberty, speech, strength, and success

True it is that many find some of the speech on the Internet to be offensive, and amid the din of cyberspace many hear discordant voices that they regard as indecent. The absence of governmental regulation of Internet content has unquestionably produced a kind of chaos, but as one of plaintiffs' experts put it with such resonance at the hearing: "What achieved success was the very chaos that the Internet is. The strength of the Internet is that chaos." Just as the strength of the Internet is chaos, so the strength of our liberty depends upon the chaos and cacophony of the unfettered speech the First Amendment protects. For these reasons, I without hesitation hold that the [Communications Decency Act] is unconstitutional on its face.

Stewart Dalzell

Source: 1996, ACLU, et al., v. Janet Reno, 96-963 and ALA, et al., v. Dept. of Justice, 96-1458

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Judge Stewart Dalzell on argument, conversation, government, internet, principles, and speech

The Internet may fairly be regarded as a never-ending worldwide conversation. The government may not, through the [Communications Decency Act], interrupt that conversation. . . . As the most participatory form of mass speech yet developed, the Internet deserves the highest protection from governmental intrusion. . . . The government, therefore, implicitly asks this court to limit both the amount of speech on the Internet and the availability of that speech. This argument is profoundly repugnant to First Amendment principles.

Stewart Dalzell

Source: 1996, ACLU, et al., v Janet Reno, 96-963 and ALA, et al., v Dept of Justice, 96-1458

Contributed by: Zaady

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