interest

A Quote by Thucydides on absence, accuracy, composers, contentment, desires, fear, future, history, imperfection, interest, judgment, knowledge, labor, memory, past, possessions, reflection, romance, and trust

With reference to the narrative of events, far from permitting myself to derive it from the first source that came to hand, I did not even trust my own impressions, but it rests partly on what I saw myself, partly on what others saw for me, the accuracy of the report being always tried by the most severe and detailed tests possible. My conclusions have cost me some labor from the want of coincidence between accounts of the same occurrences by different eyewitnesses, arising sometimes from imperfect memory, sometimes from undue partiality for one side or the other. The absence of romance in my history will, I fear, detract somewhat from its interest; but I shall be content if it is judged useful by those inquirers who desire an exact knowledge of the past as an aid to the interpretation of the future, which in the course of human things must resemble if it does not reflect it. My history has been composed to be an everlasting possession, not the showpiece of an hour.

Thucydides (c.460 - 400 BC)

Source: The History of the Peloponnesian War, 431—413 BC., bk. I, sec. 22

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas J. Watson on company, duty, good, ideas, inclusion, interest, justice, managers, mankind, men, mind, occupations, purity, sales, simplicity, time, and work

There is very little difference between the general manager, the sales manager, the factory manager, the office manager, the factory man, the office man and the salesman. We have different ideas and different work, but when you come down to it, there is just one thing we have to deal with throughout the whole organization - that is the "MAN." Here is the way it lines up: The Manufacturer general manager sales manager factory manager office manager factory man office man salesMan This is a man proposition pure and simple; that includes the ladies too, by the way-all mankind. I think this one point is something we should keep in mind at all times regardless of what our occupations or duties are; we are just men-men standing together, shoulder to shoulder, all working for one common good; we have one common interest, and the good of each of us as individuals affects the greater good of the company. From a talk made at the opening session of The International Time Recording Company Sales Convention, held at Endicott, NY, January 25-30, 1915.

Thomas Watson (1874 - 1956)

Source: Thomas J. Watson in Men–Minutes–Money, a Collection of Excerpts from Talks . . .

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on circumstances, ethics, faith, generosity, interest, men, and nations

I have but one system of ethics for men and for nations-to be grateful, to be faithful to all engagements and under all circumstances, to be open and generous, promoting in the long run even the interests of both.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on ability, acting, anxiety, character, citizenship, concern, difficulty, duty, honesty, individuality, information, interest, knowledge, men, motives, necessity, time, and understanding

Of the various executive abilities, no one excited more anxious concern than that of placing the interests of our fellow-citizens in the hands of honest men, with understanding sufficient for their stations. No duty is at the same time more difficult to fulfil. The knowledge of character possessed by a single individual is of necessity limited. To seek out the best through the whole Union, we must resort to the information which from the best of men, acting disinterestedly and with the purest motives, is sometimes incorrect.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Source: Letter to Elias Shipman and others of New Haven, July 12, 1801.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Theodore Roosevelt on children, citizenship, community, force, interest, nations, potential, suffering, welfare, and elightenment

Each child represents either a potential addition to the protective capacity and enlightened citizenship of the nation or, if allowed to suffer from neglect, a potential addition to the destructive forces of a community. . . . The interests of the nation are involved in the welfare of this array of children no less than in our great material affairs.

Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Theodore Roosevelt on america, civilization, community, conflict, conquest, day, debt, humanity, idleness, impatience, interest, judgment, mankind, morality, nations, needs, rudeness, rules, sentimentality, stability, success, war, and world

Theodore Roosevelt, impatient with the excesses of "purely sentimental historians," authored his own stirring vindication of America's relations with the Indians: Looked at from the standpoint of the ultimate result, there was little real difference to the Indian whether the land was taken by treaty or by war. . . . No treaty could be satisfactory to the whites, no treaty served the needs of humanity and civilization, unless it gave the land to the Americans as unreservedly as any successful war. Whether the whites won the land by treaty, by armed conflict, or, as was actually the case, by a mixture of both, mattered comparatively little so long as the land was won. It was all-important that it should be won, for the benefit of civilization and in the interests of mankind. It is, indeed, a warped, perverse, and silly morality which would forbid a course of conquest that has turned whole continents into the seats of mighty and flourishing civilized nations. . . . It is as idle to apply to savages the rules of international morality which obtain between stable and cultured communities, as it would be to judge the fifth-century English conquest of Britain by the standards of to-day. The most ultimately righteous of all wars is a war with savages, though it is apt to be also the most terrible and inhuman. The rude, fierce settler who drives the savage from the land lays all civilized mankind under a debt to him. . . . It is of incalculable importance that America, Australia, and Siberia should pass out of the hands of their red, black, and yellow aboriginal owners, and become the heritage of the dominant world races.

Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919)

Source: The Winning of the West: Book IV, 1896

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sydney J. Harris on business, careers, interest, parenthood, people, preparation, and sons

American parents, on the whole, do not want their sons to be artisans or craftsmen, but business or professional people. As a result, millions of youngsters are being prepared for careers they have little aptitude for - and little interest in except for dubious prestige.

Sydney J. Harris (1917 - 1986)

Source: Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Susan Brownell Anthony on desires, interest, justice, spirit, weakness, and work

Oh, yes. I'd do it all again; the spirit is willing yet; I feel the same desire to do the work but the flesh is weak. It's too bad that our bodies wear out while our interests are just as strong as ever.

Susan B. Anthony (1820 - 1906)

Source: Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, vol. 3, ch. 71. by Anna Howard Shaw, 1908.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stuart Kauffman on individuality, interest, selfishness, society, and trying

A free society that allows each individual to seek his or her own selfish ends (without deliberately trying to harm anyone else) will produce a state in which everyone's interest is optimized without any individual knowing in advance what that state might be.

Stuart Kauffman

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sogyal Rinpoche on absence, desires, egotism, existence, facts, fiction, ideas, interest, irony, knowledge, needs, suffering, survival, and thought

So ego, then, is the absence of true knowledge of who we really are, together with its result: a doomed clutching on, at all costs, to a cobbled together and makeshift image of ourselves, an inevitably chameleon charlatan self that keeps changing and has to, to keep alive the fiction of its existence. . . . Ego is then defined as incessant movements of grasping at a delusory notion of "I" and "mine," self and other, and all the concepts, ideas, desires, and activity that will sustain that false construction. . . . The fact that we need to grasp at all and go on and on grasping shows that in the depths of our being we know that the self does not inherently exist. . . . {The ego's greatest triumph} is to inveigle us into believing its best interests are our best interests, and even into identifying our very survival with its own. This is a savage irony, considering that ego and its grasping are at the root of all our suffering. Yet ego is so convincing, and we have been its dupe for so long, that the thought that we might ever become egoless terrifies us.

Sogyal Rinpoche

Source: Sogyal Rinpoche in The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, HarperCollins Publishers, 1993, p. 117

Contributed by: Zaady

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