intelligence

A Quote by unknown on pride and intelligence

A man proud of his intelligence is like a condemned man proud of his cell

unknown

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Stephen R. Covey on leaders, achievers, voice, intelligence, physical, emotional, mental, spiritual, vision, discipline, passion, conscience, and 8th habit

When you study the lives of all great achievers--those who have had the greatest influence on others, those who have made things happen--you will find a pattern. Through their persistent efforts and inner struggle, they have greatly expanded their four native human intelligences or capacities. The highest manifestations of these four intelligences are: for mental, vision; for the physical, discipline; for the emotional, passion; for the spiritual, conscience. These manifestations also represent our highest means of expressing our voice.

Stephen Covey (1932 -)

Source: The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness, Pages: 65

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Freeman Dyson on reality, intelligence, and science

Mind and intelligence are woven into the fabric of our universe in a way that altogether surpasses our understanding.

Freeman Dyson

Contributed by: Joe

A Quote by Scott Berkun on intelligence, logic, argument, and self-deception

The problem with smart people is that they like to be right and sometimes will defend ideas to the death rather than admit they’re wrong. This is bad. Worse, if they got away with it when they were young (say, because they were smarter than their parents, their friends, and their parent’s friends) they’ve probably built an ego around being right, and will therefore defend their perfect record of invented righteousness to the death. Smart people often fall into the trap of preferring to be right even if it’s based in delusion, or results in them, or their loved ones, becoming miserable. (Somewhere in your town there is a row of graves at the cemetery, called smartypants lane, filled with people who were buried at poorly attended funerals, whose headstones say “Well, at least I was right.”)

Until they come face to face with someone who is tenacious enough to dissect their logic, and resilient enough to endure the thinly veiled intellectual abuse they dish out during debate (e.g. “You don’t really think that do you?” or “Well if you knew the <insert obscure reference here> rule/law/corollary you wouldn’t say such things”), they’re never forced to question their ability to defend bad ideas. Opportunities for this are rare: a new boss, a new co-worker, a new spouse. But if their obsessiveness about being right is strong enough, they’ll reject those people out of hand before they question their own biases and self-manipulations. It can be easier for smart people who have a habit of defending bad ideas to change jobs, spouses, or cities rather than honestly examine what is at the core of their psyche (and often, their misery).

Scott Berkun

Source: Why Smart People Defend Bad Ideas: http://www.scottberkun.com/essays/essay40.htm

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozar on love, genius, intelligence, art, music, and imagination

Neither a lofty degree of intelligence nor imagination nor both together go to the making of genius. Love, love, love, that is the soul of genius.

Wolfgang Mozart

Contributed by: Gg

A Quote by Albert Einstein on einstein, opposition, and intelligence

Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds.

Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

Contributed by: Dawn

A Quote by Carl Edward Sagan on understanding, ecstasy, intelligence, brain, thinking, feeling, and carl sagan

The use of our intelligence quite properly gives us pleasure. In this respect the brain is like a muscle. When we think well, we feel good. Understanding is a kind of ecstasy.

Carl Sagan (1934 - 1996)

Source: thinkexist.com

Contributed by: Zoe

A Quote by Ray Kurzweil on intelligence

Intelligence is: (a) the most complex phenomenon in the Universe; or (b) a profoundly simple process. The answer, of course, is (c) both of the above. It's another one of those great dualities that make life interesting.

Ray Kurzweil

Source: The Age of Spiritual Machines: When Computers Exceed Human Intelligence, Pages: 118

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by James Surowiecki on groups, crowds, independence, diversity, decision making, decisions, judgement, collective, and intelligence

Independence is important to intelligent decision making for two reasons. First, it keeps the mistakes that people make from becoming correlated. Errors in individual judgement won't wreck the group's collective judgement as long as those errors aren't systematically pointing in the same direction. One of the quickest ways to make people's judgements systematically biased is to make them dependent on each other for information. Second, independent individuals are more likely to have a new information rather than the same old data everyone is already familiar with. The smartest groups, then, are made up of people with diverse perspectives who are able to stay independent of each other. Independence doesn't imply rationality or impartiality though. You can be biased and irrational, but as long as you're independent, you won't make the group any dumber.

James Surowiecki

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by James Surowiecki on bubble, group, intelligence, independence, diversity, and judgement

Bubbles and crashes are textbook examples of collective decision making gone wrong. In a bubble, all of the conditions that make groups intelligent -- independence, diversity, private judgement--disappear.

James Surowiecki

Source: The Wisdom of Crowds, Pages: 244

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

Syndicate content