ingratitude

A Quote by William Shakespeare on art and ingratitude

Blow, blow thou winter wind! Thou art not so unkind As man's ingratitude.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, Act II, Scene vii [short excerpt]

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on corruption, ingratitude, lies, and vices

I hate ingratitude more in a man Than lying, vainness, babbling drunkenness, Or any taint of vice whose strong corruption Inhabits our frail blood.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Twelfth Night

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, angels, day, deed, doubt, envy, friendship, good, heart, honor, ingratitude, judgment, kindness, love, men, nobility, overcoming, perception, pity, power, preparation, privacy, reason, soul, speech, tears, time,

If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle: I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on; 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent, That day he overcame the Nervii: Look, in this place ran Cassius' dagger through: See what a rent the envious Casca made: Through this the well-beloved Brutus stabb'd; And as he pluck'd his cursed steel away, Mark how the blood of Caesar follow'd it, As rushing out of doors, to be resolved If Brutus so unkindly knock'd, or no; For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar's angel: Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him! This was the most unkindest cut of all; For when the noble Caesar saw him stab, Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms, Quite vanquish'd him: then burst his mighty heart; And, in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey's Statua, Which all the while ran blood, great Cæsar fell, O! what a fall was there, my countrymen; Then I, and you, and all of us fell down, Whilst bloody treason flourish'd over us. O! now you weep, and I perceive you feel The dint of pity; these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what, weep you when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded? Look you here, Here is himself, marr'd, as you see, with traitors. . . . . Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honourable: What private griefs they have, alas! I know not, That made them do it; they are wise and honourable, And will no doubts with reason answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend. . . . . For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action , nor utterance, nor power of speech, To stir men's blood; I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Mark Antony in Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on art, bitterness, friendship, ingratitude, life, and rudeness

Blow, blow, thou winter wind, Thou art not so unkind As man's ingratitude: Thy tooth is not so keen, Because thou art not seen, Although thy breath be rude. Heigh-ho! sing, heigh-ho! unto the green holly: Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly. Then heigh-ho! the holly! This life is most jolly. Freeze, freeze, thou bitter sky, That dost not bite so nigh As benefits forgot: Though thou the waters warp, Thy sting is not so sharp As friend remember'd not.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, Act 2, scene 7.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William George Jordan on crime, evil, good, ingratitude, and revenge

Ingratitude is a crime more despicable than revenge, which is only returning evil for evil, while ingratitude returns evil for good.

William Jordan

Source: The Power of Truth, p. 25.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William George Jordan on ingratitude and life

Much of the seeming ingratitude in life comes from our magnifying of our own acts, our minifying of the acts of others.

William Jordan

Source: The Power of Truth, p. 35.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William J. H. Boetcker on defeat, ingratitude, leadership, life, mankind, men, power, proof, and stupidity

The man who is worthy of being "a leader of men" will never complain about the stupidity of his helpers, the ingratitude of mankind nor the inappreciation of the public. These are all a part of the great game of life. To meet them and overcome them and not to go down before them in disgust, discouragement or defeat-that is the final proof of power.

William J. H. Boetcker

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on ingratitude

A man is very apt to complain of the ingratitude of those who have risen far above him.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

Source: Life of Johnson (Boswell). Vol. vi. Chap. iv. 1776.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on children, commitment, disappointment, divinity, failure, faith, fatherhood, gifts, god, ingratitude, justice, learning, life, love, men, mercy, perspective, power, reflection, and temptation

Yet, seeing this ingratitude of those who are without perspective should not cause us to make reflexive rejoinders to unbelievers. Rather, we, for our part, ought to contemplate how truly deep God's commitment to free agency must be, how truly deep (and unpossessive) his love for his children must be to allow us to err, to fail, to learn, and to grow. And how wonderful is his refusal to impose, by his power, a faith that otherwise seems to come so slowly and to so few when men are left free. Sensing, even on such a small scale, these divine commitments ought to help us to reflect them in our lives. If we are tempted to unwise responses because of our small-scale frustrations with those who are ungrateful, with those who misuse their gifts, lo, how much greater the sense of disappointment at the divine level is. And yet his commitment to free agency remains intact, and his love, justice, and mercy continue even for those who defy their Father.

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: For The Power Is In Them, pg. 28-29, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on ingratitude, talent, and time

We can't dwell upon another's ingratitude without using up our time and talents unprofitably.

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: Things As They Really Are © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

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